POINT OF VIEW: Broward school shooting shows affluence no protection


This is my first letter to a newspaper. But in the wake of this week’s tragic shootings as Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, I’m motivated to share my thoughts and feelings.

I retired two years ago as a Broward County guidance counselor who worked my last 6½ years at that school in Parkland. I am distraught over the carnage in my old school, but I’m not surprised. The commentators on television are oblivious to the immense stressors on our school kids, and the paucity of mental health resources they are offered.

In my first five years at Stoneman Douglas High, my caseload was 800 students. My last year and a half. my caseload was lower but was still more than 600 students. In addition, I was responsible for doing time-consuming Individual Education Plans (IEPs).

The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) recommends a student-to-counselor ratio of 250:1. When I retired, we had five full-time guidance counselors and a (supervisory) director for a student population of about 3,400.

The reason for the lack of master’s degree-level guidance counselor services was always budgetary. We guidance counselors, and our fellow teachers, administrators, social workers and family therapists, did the very best we could sincerely do caring for each of our kids. But unless the funding paradigm for our public schools — and society overall — embraces community mental health, we are missing the message that underlies our societal tragedies.

Yes, Stoneman Douglas High is a great school with terrific kids, and school staff that epitomizes excellence. However, it has not been immune from tragedy. When I was there, we had three suicides in a period of a year and a half. These tragedies led me to write a brochure titled, “The Psychological Challenges of Affluence,” which I hoped would open parents’ minds to monitoring their kid’s mental health and the value of seeking therapeutic assistance when needed.

For example, the brochure points out: “Suburban, affluent youth are not seen as being at-risk, but they are; affluence does not guarantee emotional and mental health.”

Indeed, no public school or community is immune to mental health issues. We need to provide more mental health support for all of our students.

ROBERT KENNER, PONTE VEDRA

Editor’s note: Robert Kenner is a former school guidance counselor and teacher in Broward County schools.



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