Letters If felon is caught with gun, make it a 20-year mandatory term

Felon caught with

gun? 20 years, period

It’s apparent that the vast majority of people committing drive-by shootings and drug-related murders are criminals who have previously been convicted of a felony(s). They have little fear of the law or the consequences for breaking the law because they know what the odds are of being caught, and if caught they know that a plea bargain will result in a lenient sentence with early release. Some suspects even wear a smile in their mug shots or while appearing in court.

To reduce the crime rate that’s engulfing some of our communities, I suggest that any felon apprehended with a firearm, regardless of the circumstances, be denied bail and upon conviction receive a mandatory 20-year sentence without early release.

Only severe punishment will stem crime and stop the revolving doors of our prisons.


Does no one know

how to act in church?

Once upon a time, and not all that long ago, people knew how to behave in church. Now, many clearly they don’t.

For the second year in a row, President Trump received a standing ovation, cheers, and applause before he and his wife, Melania, were seated for the Christmas Eve service at Bethesda-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Palm Beach.

And for the second year in a row, I’m writing to address that.

For those who don’t know any better, it is totally inappropriate to give anyone a standing ovation, cheer or applaud them when they are coming to a church as part of the congregation. The policy at Bethesda-by-the-Sea doesn’t approve of that behavior and the Christmas Eve ushers tried to stop it — all to no avail.

Throughout the decades, dignitaries from around the world have attended services at Bethesda-by-the-Sea — all arriving quietly and without any hoopla.

I talked to Judy O’Hara Vetrick, who grew up in Palm Beach and attended St. Edward’s Catholic Church during the days when President John F. Kennedy was in office and frequented that church, and asked if the congregation stood up and applauded when he was in attendance.

“No,” she said almost laughing. “He came in quietly and the only way anyone knew the president or his family was in church was by the Secret Service guys there wearing dark sunglasses.”

So for those who need a church-behavior reminder, that means, Mr. President, you need to quietly slip into the pew and keep your thumbs up gestures to yourself. And to those in the congregation, there will be no standing, applauding, cheering, picture- or video-taking at the first sighting of the president.

He is, after all, only a man. And you, after all, are in church to celebrate the birth of the Christ child. Not the leader of the Republican Party.


Mortality report

seemed one-sided

Reading the Washington Post article, “Americans live shorter lives than peers globally” (Thursday), on life expectancy, I can only think that it should have been titled “A progressive’s view of the reasons why American life expectancy is shorter than other developed world countries.”

With such widely published issues such as childhood and adult obesity and type 2 diabetes, the nationwide opioid epidemic along with other drug-related violence, writer Christopher Ingraham could only give these major issues token recognition while espousing a 2014 “review” by an unidentified source claiming the lion’s share of the mortality difference can be explained by “variations in non-medical determinants of health.”

He lists many non-implemented progressive policies as causes: mandated paid maternity leave, sick leave and vacation time, housing assistance, unemployment benefits, tax code favoring the wealthy, early start child education and public financing. This along with the usual call for universal health care and gun control covered the major left talking points.

I would like to have read a more objective report concerning this important issue.


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