Hurricane safety: Those who have lived through storms offer their advice


Those who live in Florida and other parts of the country that frequently get hurricane warnings know what to do when a storm is bearing down on them. For those who rarely get a mega-storm in their state, those who have been through hurricanes are sharing their expertise via social media

>> Read more trending news 

It’s the little things that you don’t focus on daily. Paperwork like your birth certificate, passport and credit cards needs to be gathered before the storm, according to people who have survived storms. 

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CAROLINA PEEPS (AND ALL THOSE IN THE PATH OF #HURRICANEFLORENCE): - Make sure you know where all your documents are NOW. Your birth certificates, your passports, your insurance documents. Your social security cards, your driver's licenses. Credit cards. Put them in ziploc bags and get them somewhere safe (along with your laptops). - Make sure your hurricane kit is up-to-date NOW. Include fresh water. Lots and lots of fresh water. (Pro tip: there's no need to go out and buy fresh water. You have fresh water coming out of your taps now. Just fill up a bunch of containers. Enough for everyone in your family and your pets for several days. Same for food. And if you have a barbecue pit, be sure that's secure. After the storm, that may be how you cook your food for a few days while utilities are restored.) - Pack a suitcase with a week's clothing for every family member, including medications and pet supplies. IF YOU CAN LEAVE, DO SO. If you're planning to ride the storm out, do it anyway. Because if folks have to come rescue you, you're going to want to have your bag ready to go. (Don't forget underwear. Because guess what I forgot last year? That's right, UNDERWEAR.) - Gas up the car. IF YOU CAN LEAVE, DO SO. If you're planning on riding out the storm, get your car to higher ground ahead of time. We lost both our cars because they were safely parked in our garage, which flooded. - Stay in touch as long as you can, via Facebook updates, or whatever. Let friends who are not in the path of the hurricane know where you are and what you're up to. STAY CONNECTED. - Remember: even though the storm may be really bad, the aftermath, when electricity is down and clean water is unavailable and roads are impassable is JUST as bad. You're preparing not just for the duration of the storm, but the aftermath as well. - Finally, BE SAFE. Hang in there, li'l buckaroos. I'm thinking of you.

A post shared by Karen Walrond :: Chookooloonks (@heychookooloonks) on

>>Read: Building an emergency disaster kit can be easy and cheap, here's how

Other people added their comments to the post, suggesting items like a hand-crank transistor radio to stay connected. Others still suggested getting cash now instead of waiting until after the stormwaters recede.

Those on social media may be onto something. 

>>Read: Family emergency supply kit must-haves

The National Hurricane Center agrees that people should plan before the storm hits. 

It’s also important to have a family emergency plan. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has put together a checklist as a starting point.

>>Read: Storm evacuations: How coin, frozen cup of water could keep you from getting sick

Georgia’s Emergency Management Agency has suggested learning the flood risks and getting ready kits together for both your home and your car.

What should be in the kit? Water, food, a battery-operated radio, garbage bags and a can opener are a good start. 

>>Read: Why you should never use a generator during a storm 

If you are forced to evacuate, make sure you have helpful apps to find gas, hotel rooms and traffic routes.


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