Townhouses to replace mobile home park in Juno Beach


Two dozen luxury townhouses at the site of Floridian Ocean Park for mobile homes on U.S. 1 were given unanimous final approval Wednesday by the town council.

The Ocean Breeze townhouses, each about 2,000 square feet, are expected to sell for about $500,000. Construction of the first of four two-story structures — each building will have six townhouses — is expected to be completed in 2015. Total construction costs are expected to be about $10 million, said property owner and developer Larry Wright.

“This is a prime piece of property for infill development,” said Troy Holloway, landscape architect for the 3-acre project located just south of Marcinski Road.

Wright’s company, Tequesta-based Floridian Ocean Park, bought the property in 2004 for $1.5 million, according to county records.

Ocean Breeze is the the second new high-priced residential development in the oceanfront town of about 3,500 year-round residents. Toll Brothers is building 29 single-family homes in The Preserve, also on the west side of U.S. 1 about 2 miles south of Ocean Breeze. Preserve prices start at $900,000.

About 15 residents still live in the mobile homes in Floridian Ocean Park, which is bordered by the five-story Ocean Key condominium on the north and the Juno Beach Condominium mobile home park on the south. Many of the Floridian mobile homes are about 50 years old and cannot be moved, said Wright.

Owners required to leave the park are eligible for $3,000 to $6,000 in-state compensation through the Florida Mobile Home Relocation Trust Fund. The money comes from licensing fees paid by owners to the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles.

Wright also built the Juno Dunes and Ocean Ridge residential developments in Juno Beach.

The town’s zoning would have allowed the buildings to have been three stories instead of the approved two stories.

“We didn’t design three-story townhouses because people do not want to climb stairs,” Wright said.


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