Sukiyaki is a quick dinner amid hustle and bustle


Looking for a quick meal at this busy time of year? Try this Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef and Soy Sauce). In Japan, sukiyaki is a one-dish meal made right at the table. It’s a great dinner for when you’re in a hurry. The cooking can be done in 5 minutes.

Prepare all the ingredients in advance by boiling the noodles and cutting and arranging the remaining ingredients on a platter in order of use. Then bring the colorful plate to the table and cook. An electric frying pan or wok works well here. You can enjoy the aromas as the food cooks.

Or, if you prefer, simply prepare the dish in the kitchen and serve on individual plates. Remove from the pan and serve immediately for freshest taste.

Helpful hints:

  • A quick way to slice scallions is to snip them with a scissors.
  • Sake can be substituted for the dry sherry. Either one can be bought in small splits. Or add 2 more tablespoons soy sauce instead of the alcohol.

Countdown:

  • Place water for noodles on to boil.
  • Prepare ingredients.
  • Cook noodles.
  • Make sukiyaki.

Shopping list:

To buy: 1/2 pound sirloin, flank or skirt steak, 1 small package shitake mushrooms, 1 10-ounce bag washed, ready-to-eat spinach, 1 small bunch scallions, 1 small package Chinese noodles or angel hair pasta, 1 small bottle sesame oil, 1 small bottle low-sodium soy sauce and 1 small bottle dry sherry.

Staples: fat-free, low-salt chicken broth, sugar, onion and black peppercorns.

Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef and Soy Sauce)

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

3 ounces fat-free, no-salt-added chicken broth

2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce

2 tablespoons dry sherry

1/4 pound Chinese noodles or angel hair pasta

1/2 pound sirloin, flank or skirt steak

2 teaspoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon sugar

2 cups sliced onion

1 1/2 cups sliced shitake mushrooms

6 cups washed, ready-to-eat spinach

1 cup sliced scallions

Freshly ground black pepper

Place a large saucepan filled with water on to boil. Mix chicken broth, soy sauce and sherry together in a small bowl and set aside. Boil noodles 2 minutes or according to package instructions. Drain and divide between 2 dinner plates.

Remove visible fat from the steak and cut into thin strips, about 2 inches long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide. At the table, heat sesame oil in an electric wok or frying pan or over a portable burner. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve. Add the steak and toss in the pan about 30 seconds. Remove to a plate. Add the onion and cook 3 minutes. Add half of the chicken broth mixture and stir. Add mushrooms and cook 30 seconds. Add spinach, scallions and remaining sauce and cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Return steak to the skillet and toss with other ingredients. Season with pepper to taste. Remove from the pan and serve over noodles. Spoon all the sauce from the pan over the top.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 672 calories (28 percent from fat), 21.1 g fat (6.4 g saturated, 8.6 g monounsaturated), 108 mg cholesterol, 51.4 g protein, 69.4 g carbohydrates, 7.3 g fiber, 733 mg sodium.



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