Chicken pasta dish for easy weeknight dinner


On hectic days, finding an easy recipe for weeknight dinner is a real blessing.

 Simplifying mealtime is the mantra of a Phoenix-based couple, Chad and Donna Elick, whose new cookbook “The Simple Kitchen,” is filled with family-friendly ideas, such as Pan-Fried Firecracker Pork Chops and Three-Cheese Meat Lasagna. The couple are the creators of The Slow Roasted Italian food blog, which has more than 2 million social media followers. 

 This pasta dish loaded with Mediterranean flavors is ready in 30 minutes. 

 ——— 

 CHEESY GREEK PASTA WITH CHICKEN 

 Serves 6 

 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil and Italian herbs, drained 

 1 large yellow onion, sliced 

 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into ½-inch pieces 

 6 cloves garlic, sliced 

 1 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved 

 1 pound linguine pasta, uncooked 

2 teaspoons dried oregano 

 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 

 1 teaspoon kosher salt 

 8 cups baby spinach leaves, divided 

 4 cups chicken stock 

 1 cup chardonnay 

 8 ounces feta cheese, crumbled 

 Combine the tomatoes, onion, chicken, garlic, olives, linguine, oregano, pepper and salt with 4 cups of the spinach in a 12-inch braising pan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Pour the chicken stock and the wine over the top. 

 Cover and bring to a boil. Cook for 7 to 9 minutes, until the pasta is al dente (has a bite to it). Toss the pasta with tongs occasionally to keep it from sticking to the bottom of the pot. You will still have some liquid in the pan when the pasta is done cooking; this is going to make the base for our delicious cheese sauce. 

 Turn off the heat and add the cheese to the pasta. Toss the pasta with tongs until the cheese melts into the pasta. Toss in the remaining 4 cups of spinach. 

 From “The Simple Kitchen” by Chad and Donna Elick; Page Street Publishing Co. 2017.


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