Just in time for holidays, Walmart offering curbside grocery pickup


Walmart has launched a new curbside service that allows shoppers to order groceries online and pick them up at the store without ever leaving their cars.

The free service is available at five Walmart Supercenters in South Florida, including locations in West Palm Beach and Lake Park.

» RELATED: Shipt delivers groceries for a price

The new service allows customers to order groceries online at www.walmart.com/grocery and schedule pickup time. Customers can shop more than 30,000 grocery items, including fresh meat, dairy, produce and common household items.

Participating locations will offer designated parking spaces for pickup customers and Walmart personal shoppers will load items into their vehicles.

“With 70 percent of the U.S. population living within 5 miles of an existing Walmart store, this is an idea that simply makes sense for us,” Betsy Harden of Walmart’s National Media Relations said in a statement released by the company. “We have the locations already in place, and with our website and mobile app expertise, we’re able to combine those things in a way that helps our customers save time and still take advantage of our everyday low prices.”

Of the five participating Walmart Supercenters, two are in Palm Beach County. They are the Walmart Supercenter at 101 N. Congress Ave. in Lake Park and the Walmart Supercenter at 4225 45th St. in West Palm Beach.

Last month, the grocery delivery company Shipt launched a similar service in Palm Beach County.

Shipt allows customers to place and pay for orders using its app, which is avail able for iOS and Android. The personal shoppers, who shop for and deliver the groceries, are independent contractors, earning an average of $15 to $20 an hour, according to the company’s website.

The company offers membership plans, which are required to place an order: either an annual fee of $99 or a monthly fee of $14, both of which grant customers unlimited grocery deliveries. Orders above $35 are delivered to members for free, while orders under $35 incur a $7 delivery fee.

There are some add-on costs. In one example on the Shipt website, a loaf of Wonder Bread, which costs $2.29 in the store, would cost $2.59 if delivered. Using Shipt, customers can expect to pay about $5 more for a $35 order than they would if they bought it in the store themselves, according to the company’s website.


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