Character traits you wouldn't believe give you an edge in your career


Are you one of those anal-retentive employees? It's OK. Be honest with your professional self.

»RELATED: How to recover when you’ve majorly messed up at work

Maybe you constantly bug co-workers about due dates as if they didn't already know or are a super stickler for how team members use company supplies. And that's not always a bad thing, right? 

Believe it or not, some perceivably annoying on-the-job characteristics can become more effective and gain approving reviews from higher-ups, according to psychology and career experts.

Here are a few character traits that might be giving you an edge in your career:

The crisis communicator. This personality always freaks out about office events like deadlines, new hires, resignations or company shifts. This person doesn't like assignment surprises or getting out of his comfort zone.

If you're this type of worker: Whenever real emergency situations arise, you're the perfect person to panic for the entire team. The other good thing is that employers will always know how you genuinely feel — instantly gaining your gut reaction to tackle and execute the tasks at hand. 

In a Psychology Today article, emotions expert and author Alice Boyes shared that these worry wart ways are at times advantageous because anxious workers usually have Plan B and C prepared. 

The polite pushover. This personality is never combative and will work no matter the chaotic office conditions.

If you're this type of worker: Employers can trust that you will consider everyone's feelings, backgrounds and rationales. You’re always respectful of others, which often leads to transformative benefits for the entire team.  

The negative Nancy. This personality finds loom and doom in every move the company makes or when collaborating with certain co-workers on team assignments.

If you're this type of worker: At least your boss and/or colleagues know what you're thinking. And bluntly bringing awareness to company cons can help improve morale and productivity. And when projects don’t turn out as expected, you’re less likely to become upset, according to social psychologist Kate Sweeny, who was cited in a Society for Personality and Social Psychology article.

The office overachiever. This personality will go above and beyond the call of duty time again and typically doesn't take "can't" attitudes lightly. 

If you're this type of worker: Employers can definitely count on you to pick up the slack of procrastinators and keep senior leadership in the know about inefficient, time-wasting workers not worthy of their positions.

Tim Eisenhauer, co-founder of Axero Solutions and the first company intranet software, Communifire, told Inc. Magazine that these are usually your “big idea” folks who push production to new heights. 

The manic micromanager. This personality nags and helicopter parents the daily activities of people and projects within their direct supervision.

If you're this type of worker: Yes, this overbearing demeanor is irritating, but employers appreciate your unwavering devotion to meeting goals, conserving resources and paying attention to operational details. 

How do you think tech expert the late Steve Jobs built Apple into a powerhouse? 


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