Social Security: ‘Rosie the Riveter’ was working women’s icon


“Rosie the Riveter” is an American icon representing women working in factories during World War II. These women learned new jobs and filled in for the men who were away at war. They produced much of the armaments and ammunition to supply the war effort.

They also paid FICA on their wages, contributing to the Social Security program. These “Rosies” embodied the “can-do” spirit immortalized in a poster by J. Howard Miller. Both the image and the spirit live on today.

If you asked Rosie about Social Security, she would use her rivet gun to drive home the value of Social Security for women. More Rosies work today, and nearly 60 percent of people receiving benefits are women. Women tend to live longer than men, so Social Security’s inflation-adjusted benefits help protect women. You can outlive your savings and investments, but Social Security is for life. Women provide their own basic level of protection when they work and pay taxes into the Social Security system. Women who have been married and had low earnings or who didn’t work may be covered through their spouses’ work.

Today’s Rosie will turn her “can-do” spirit to learning more about Social Security and what role it will play in her financial plan for the future. She focuses on our pamphlet called What Every Woman Should Know available at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10127.html for a game plan.

She rolls up her sleeves and sets up her my Social Security account (www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount) to review her earnings and estimates. If she finds an incorrect posting, she’ll locate her W-2 form and quickly contact Social Security to correct it because she understands these are the earnings used to figure her benefits.

She dives into understanding benefits at our planner pages at www.socialsecurity.gov/planners. She examines how marriage, divorce, death of a spouse, work, and other issues might affect her benefits. She studies our fact sheet When to Start Receiving Retirement Benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/ to help her decide when it’s time to lay down the rivet gun. And when the time is right, she will file for retirement benefits online at www.socialsecurity.gov/retire. Whether it was keeping the war effort production lines humming or discovering what is available to her from Social Security, Rosie symbolizes the motto: “We Can Do It.” Rosie and millions like her rely on the financial protection provided by Social Security in assembling their own financial futures.

Maria Ortega is a public affairs specialist for the Social Security Administration. If you have Social Security questions, call 800-772-1213.neighborhood@pbpost.com



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in

Noel Martinez: Why work, mental health issues drive Leadership summit
Noel Martinez: Why work, mental health issues drive Leadership summit

Leadership Palm Beach County celebrates its 35th year with 1,700 alumni from elected leaders to CEOs, but a June 15 summit led by executive director Noel Martinez isn’t so much about looking back. It aims at new starts, a kind of civic crowdsourcing to solve knotty problems dominating too many headlines. Mental health in the workplace. Ex-offenders...
JUST IN: Congressmen call on feds to suspend Brightline bonds
JUST IN: Congressmen call on feds to suspend Brightline bonds

Days after Brightline completed the first leg of its passenger train service, the battle continued to grow over whether the company should be allowed to use federally approved tax-exempt bonds to finance its extension north to Orlando. Brightline carried its first paying passengers between West Palm Beach and Miami on Saturday — marking the completion...
Scripps Florida researchers win $3.6 million NIH grant to study autism
Scripps Florida researchers win $3.6 million NIH grant to study autism

JUPITER -- Scripps Florida researcher Gavin Rumbaugh won a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to continue studies of abnormal brain circuitry in autism, the nonprofit lab said Tuesday. The grant builds on Rumbaugh’s previous work, research that found a crucial period in brain development during...
Report: This is the hottest (little-known) career in America right now
Report: This is the hottest (little-known) career in America right now

The hottest job in America may be one you've never heard of, but demand for people who can fulfill the roll is very high – as is its starting pay. If you're qualified to be a data scientist, according to Bloomberg, you may find companies fighting for your services. Andrew Gardner, a senior machine learning manager in Atlanta at Symantec...
Wait, your own number is calling? It’s happening here. It’s a scam.
Wait, your own number is calling? It’s happening here. It’s a scam.

Palm Beach County residents are getting calls that seem to be from their own cell number. Received one of these? A reporter and his son did. A recorded message that purports to be from AT&T says an account has been compromised and asks people to punch in the last four digits of their social security number. It’s just...
More Stories