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Top travel agents on how to stay safe while traveling


No matter where you are traveling, you need to be safe. Things can happen — injuries, theft, losses and more.

You need to learn how to protect yourself when on the road and especially when you’re in another country. Here are eight tips from travel professionals to help you stay safe and secure while on your vacation:

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PROTECT YOUR MEDICINES

“Consider taking a prescription for your medications in case they are lost,” said Margie Lenau of Wonderland Family Vacations.

“Never pack your medication in check baggage, always put it in your carry on. Your flight could be delayed or your baggage lost. Also, carry your medical history with you. You may want to wear (a) medical ID bracelet or necklace with your personal health information. This provides emergency personnel with your medical information.”

BUY TRAVEL INSURANCE

“It is a good idea to purchase travel insurance,” said Lenau. “Even though you will be careful, you can still catch a bug or get injured. In the event that this happens, the financial burden is covered. This will give you peace of mind before and during your vacation.”

HOLD ON TO YOUR ELECTRONICS

“Always avoid handling your mobile device, electronics and even personal belongings when a train is about to depart,” said Clint Bertucci, tour guide and founder of Travr.

“It is common practice for thieves to snatch mobile devices and other items immediately before the train takes off, then step off the train leaving that door close behind them and you without your belongings and a departing train.”

SLEEP CAREFULLY

“When relaxing on a train or even when there’s any possibility of taking a nap it’s a good idea to put your arm through the handle of your bag or luggage or make sure you’re in contact with it so if it moves you can feel it,” said Bertucci.

TAKE PICTURES

Not of just the scenery, but of your important documents.

“Take a picture of your driver’s license and/or passport with your phone just before you leave home,” said Christine Hardenberger of Modern Travel Pros. “If you lose your identification, having a picture at hand can help you get a replacement or, in some cases, can even be used as a substitute. Be sure to do this just before you leave each time; this way, the photo is toward the top. The last thing you need to be doing when you lose your ID is scrolling through 10,000 photographs trying to find your copy.”

RESEARCH

“See if there is any information online you should be aware of posted from previous travelers,” said Greg Antonelle, managing director of MickeyTravels, LLC.

“For international travelers, make sure you know the correct emergency number for the country you are visiting, so you could dial quickly if you need immediate assistance. While we are all aware of 911 in the U.S., the number to dial for emergencies in foreign countries varies.”

LEAVE COPIES BEHIND

“Make three color copies of your passport: Leave one at home with someone who can easily access it if needed, put a copy in your cabin/room safe and have your traveling partner carry a copy of yours and you carry a copy of theirs,” said Sara Perkins, Dream Vacations Franchise Owner in Abingdon, Md.

“In the event the passport is lost or stolen, it’ll be easier to work with local government or U.S. Embassy to get a new one.”

DRESS RIGHT

“Dress for the culture you are visiting,” said Mario Scalzi.

“In Italy, only little kids under the age of 10 should ever wear shorts in public other than on the beach or playground. Dress casual but stylish. Don’t stick out. Blend in. Never, never, never wear gym clothes or fanny packs of any kind.”

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TravelPulse is a leading travel authority on the Web, providing consumer travel news and insider tips and advice for an ever-changing travel world.



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