You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myPalmBeachPost.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myPalmBeachPost.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myPalmBeachPost.com.

Japan eyes certification for guide interpreters for foreign visitors


TOKYO - The central government intends to create a certification for regionally based guide interpreters that local governments will grant to people who participate in training sessions, in response to the rapid increase in foreign visitors to Japan. 

The government plans to submit a bill to revise the Licensed Guide Interpreters Law to the current Diet session.  

Unlike existing national qualifications, regionally based guide interpreters will be certified by prefectures, cities, towns and villages that grant them on their own, according to the bill. Each local government will compile a plan to develop guide interpreters and conduct training sessions necessary for awarding the qualification.  

Guide interpreters accompany tourists for a fee. But some have said they cannot sufficiently handle the demand from foreign tourists for services in regional areas such as going for a stroll in a town or hiking in the mountains.  

According to the Japan Tourism Agency, there are about 20,000 certified guide interpreters nationwide, but 75 percent of them are based in Tokyo, Osaka Prefecture and other urban areas. The government aims to draw foreign tourists into regional areas with the certification for regionally based guide interpreters.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

Southwest Airlines to end practice of overbooking flights
Southwest Airlines to end practice of overbooking flights

Southwest Airlines plans to stop overbooking flights — an industry practice implicated in an ugly incident on a United Airlines flight that has damaged United's reputation with the flying public.  Last year Southwest bumped 15,000 passengers off flights, more than any other U.S. airline. Carriers say they sometimes sell more tickets than...
Three trips, three steps closer to a breakup
Three trips, three steps closer to a breakup

When I met Max, he had just returned to New York from Los Angeles, where he had broken up with his long-distance girlfriend. We were attracted to each other, and so we proceeded to do some creative calculus, wherein, because he had been the break-er and not the break-ee, we could immediately start dating.  This (practically fabricated!) relationship...
The Inn at Little Washington offers a peek at its carefully concocted grounds
The Inn at Little Washington offers a peek at its carefully concocted grounds

Joneve Murphy reaches beneath a row cover and pulls a baby French breakfast radish from the loose, dark soil. She hands it to her boss, chef Patrick O'Connell, who carefully brushes off the dirt, removes the roots and bites into half of it. The radish, he declares, should be paired with foie gras.  This verdict is from the palate that has launched...
This couple took their 11-month-old camping for 12 days. Would you?
This couple took their 11-month-old camping for 12 days. Would you?

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Matt and Kimberly Kinney always travel light when they head into the woods, leaving behind everything but the necessities and keeping their backpacks as slim as possible. Two summers ago they decided to add one very heavy item to the packing list: their 22-pound infant.  In July 2015, the Sacramento parents took their...
United to offer bumped flyers up to $10,000 after video flap
United to offer bumped flyers up to $10,000 after video flap

DALLAS (AP) — United Airlines says it will raise the limit — to $10,000 — on payments to customers who give up seats on oversold flights and will increase training for employees as it deals with fallout from the video of a passenger being violently dragged from his seat.  United is also vowing to reduce, but not eliminate, overbooking...
More Stories