How to circle the globe


We’ve come a long way from the era of the fictitious circumnavigator Phileas Fogg. Traveling around the world today can take far fewer than 80 days, especially by plane, as the following multimodal trips indicate. Here are some options for tourists who have enough of the spirit of exploration to try to circle the globe.

By Private Jet

Private jet trips can encircle the globe in a matter of weeks. Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts (fourseasons.com) sends its 52-seat private jet on a 24-day trip departing Sept. 3, 2017, from the United States for Asia, Africa and Europe, staying in each stop for a few days at its resorts to snorkel in the Maldives or go on safari in Tanzania ($135,000 a person).

Since 1995, TCS World Travel (tcsworldtravel.com) has been offering trips around the world by jet. It has four trips scheduled for both 2017 and 2018, including its 24-day “Around the World Classic” trip, departing Sept. 27, 2017,that stops at Machu Picchu; Easter Island; the Great Barrier Reef; Angkor Wat; the Taj Mahal; the Serengeti Plain; Petra, Jordan; and Marrakech, Morocco ($79,950 a person).

The French operator Safrans du Monde (safransdumonde.com) still has space available on its 22-day, Nov. 19 departure to 11 destinations including Machu Picchu, Tahiti, New Zealand, Myanmar and Petra (21,900 euros, about $24,500, per person).

By Luxury Cruise

For those with four or more months on their hands, luxury cruise lines stitch together itineraries — with some sections sold separately — into complete circumnavigations.

Best known for its trans-Atlantic cruises, Cunard (cunard.com) offers an around-the-world departure over 120 nights aboard the 2,068-passenger Queen Elizabeth (from $19,998 a person). Departing Jan. 7, 2017, from Southampton, England, the ship travels west to New York and the Caribbean. After transiting the Panama Canal, it visits Mexico, Hawaii, Samoa, Tonga, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, Vietnam and South Africa before continuing homeward. Another circumnavigation will run Jan. 7 to May 10, 2018.

Oceania Cruises’ (oceaniacruises.com) 2018 circumnavigation, “Around the World in 180 Days,” departs Jan. 3. Round trip from Miami, the 684-passenger Insignia visits 40 countries and 87 ports beginning in the Caribbean and Brazil before crossing the Atlantic for Africa and rounding the Cape of Good Hope to India, Thailand, Indonesia, Australia, South Pacific islands, Hawaii, Mexico and Panama Canal (remaining cabins from $39,999 per person).

By Freighter

Those who have hundreds to spend rather than thousands can hop a Maris freighter (freightercruises.com) as it circumnavigates the seas. Many ships reserve a few cabins for leisure travelers on around-the-world trips, ranging from 54 to 126 days (fares are 100 to 130 euros, about $112 to $145, per person per day). Ships vary but usually carry four to 12 passengers in cabins with private bathrooms. Passengers eat meals in the dining room with the ship’s officers and have access to any shipboard fitness facilities. Port calls usually last about a day, but sometimes less on smaller container ships and mail boats. The carrier’s website describes its freighter cruisers as “often an affluent but unpretentious lot who relax on board in shorts and sandals, lie reading a book in a deck chair, hearing nothing but sea gulls and waves.”

By Train

Round the World Tours (aroundtheworldtours.com) offers a variety of ways to go, including by ship and by jet, and a choice of themed trips, from surfing to couchsurfing. For maximum land contact, its luxury train itinerary strings together the world’s iconic train routes, including the Venice Simplon-Orient Express from London to Istanbul, the Trans-Siberian Railway from Moscow to Beijing and the trans-Australia train known as the Ghan over the course of about two months. Travelers hop flights between rail routes and in some cases, such as the Reunification Express train in Vietnam, join small group tours (fares from 8,900 British pounds or $11,295, per person).


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

New TripAdvisor warnings on sexual assault draw criticism

For Kristie Love, reporting a rape by a security guard at a Mexican resort was like yelling into the wind. She kept repeating her story, she said, but the words had little effect.  The resort, the Iberostar Paraiso Maya in Playa del Carmen, quickly turned matters stemming from the Oct. 19, 2010, incident over to its insurance company, which emailed...
Hotels that help you say Hola or Bonjour (and more)
Hotels that help you say Hola or Bonjour (and more)

Learning the local language is a great way to get a sense of place, and some hotels today have programs for their guests to do just that. And these aren’t your high-school foreign language classes: Travelers can immerse themselves in the dialect of their destination in fun and engaging ways.  There’s no better way to learn a new language...
While flying, keep a handle on your suitcase with a luggage tag

Hey you - you with the nondescript black suitcase! Don't let your luggage leave your home tagless. It could be making a one-way trip.  Luggage tags set your property apart from the masses of indistinguishable bags that spin around on airport conveyor belts. And your bag is far more likely to get lost or picked up by the wrong passenger in its...
12 restaurants worth traveling across the world to see
12 restaurants worth traveling across the world to see

If there's a clichéd concept for food travel, it's the bucket restaurant list. The idea, popularly thought to have come from the 2007 film "The Bucket List," might be only about 10 years old. But it feels as if it's been kicking around much longer and is overused enough to have inspired listicles as random and useless as a roundup...
Do new rules on Cuba travel mean no rum in cocktails for American travelers?
Do new rules on Cuba travel mean no rum in cocktails for American travelers?

An updated U.S. list of Cuban companies that Americans are prohibited from doing business with because of their links to the Cuban military includes two Cuban rum brands — Ron Varadero and Ron Caney — as well as the soft drink brands Tropicola, Cachito, Jupina and Nahita.  But does that mean that U.S. travelers to Cuba really have...
More Stories