Will Trump aides face fines for filing their financial statements late?


Some White House staffers could face $200 fines for failing to turn in their required personal financial disclosure statements on time. 

The White House released financial disclosure forms late last month for 92 of the roughly 180 employees required to file them, offering details for the first time on many of the staffers' enormous wealth. 

Federal law mandates that those who are required to file a report have to pay a late-filing fee of $200 to the appropriate agency, payable to the U.S. Treasury, if it's more than 30 days after its initial due date or a filing extension. 

The late fee can be waived if the White House's ethics officer determines that the tardy filing was due to "extraordinary circumstances ... which made the delay reasonably necessary," including the agency's failure to notify a job holder of the need to file the disclosure report. 

White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said everyone required to file had done so or been granted an extension as permitted by law. She said the White House would release the unreleased records 30 days after they were filed. But records released by the White House show that several staffers who filed late didn't receive extensions or filed documents after the extensions had expired. 

Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, did not receive an extension and filed 22 days late, according to the documents. Omarosa Manigault, director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison, received a 32-day extension but still missed her deadline by eight days. George Gigicos, who's in charge of making preparations for President Donald Trump's visits across the country, received a 13-day extension but filed four days after the new deadline. 

Staffers who are either commissioned officers or are paid more than $161,755 annually are required to file the disclosures, a senior administration official with knowledge of the situation but not authorized to speak publicly told reporters. 

Many news organizations reported receiving 80 or 90 of the forms. The Center for Public Integrity made them searchable. It's unclear how many aides face a fine or were granted a reprieve. 

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the Trump administration was being more transparent than previous administrations by making the forms "more accessible and more available than previously." 

But the White House did not post the disclosures online. Members of the public were required to request each one separately by name before the document was emailed to them. The White House refused to release a list of eligible staffers. 

Trump campaigned on "draining the swamp," or ridding the White House of wealthy Washington insiders, though many of the financial disclosures show those are exactly the people he hired. 

Prior to the release, reporters were shown a document with two pie charts comparing the complexity of the reports filed by the Obama and Trump aides. Though no details were provided, the charts show the Trump aides had more "complex" disclosures. 

The senior administration official bragged that the Trump administration had released the disclosures three days earlier than the Obama administration.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Hunter Harrison, CSX railroad chief, dies in Wellington
Hunter Harrison, CSX railroad chief, dies in Wellington

Hunter Harrison, the president and CEO of railroad giant CSX, died Saturday in Wellington. He was 73. CSX confirmed Harrison’s death in a statement, saying it was caused by “unexpectedly severe complications” from a recent illness. His death comes only a couple days after the company announced he was taking an unplanned medical leave...
NEW: Tempers flare at Flagler Shore meeting in West Palm
NEW: Tempers flare at Flagler Shore meeting in West Palm

Tempers flared Saturday at a public meeting about the city’s controversial Flagler Shore project, as angry opponents lambasted city officials for closing off two lanes of Flagler Drive since October for pedestrians and bikes. Most people behaved politely during the two-hour event, which was held on one block of Flagler Shore, at the...
DeVos hit with two lawsuits in one day over backlog of student debt relief claims
DeVos hit with two lawsuits in one day over backlog of student debt relief claims

Pressure is mounting on Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to take action on thousands of federal student loan forgiveness applications languishing at the U.S. Department of Education.  On Thursday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra suedDeVos and the department for failing to process more than 50,000 debt relief claims submitted by former...
Ivanka Trump, her brand dropped by some retailers, opens her own store in Trump Tower
Ivanka Trump, her brand dropped by some retailers, opens her own store in Trump Tower

Ivanka Trump's fashion company on Thursday opened a new store in the lobby of Trump Tower, where it plans to sell handbags, jewelry and candles as part of broader push to bypass retailers and sell directly to consumers.  The store in Midtown Manhattan — currently the company's only bricks-and-mortar location — comes after a number...
Music promoter dangled possible Putin meeting for Trump during campaign
Music promoter dangled possible Putin meeting for Trump during campaign

About a month after Donald Trump launched his presidential bid, a British music promoter suggested his Russian pop-star client could arrange for the new candidate to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin, according to an email obtained by The Washington Post.  The July 2015 offer by publicist Rob Goldstone came about a year before he set...
More Stories