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Report: Most Pulse shooting victims died on dance floor, in bathrooms


Of the 38 people who died inside the Pulse nightclub during the June 2016 shooting rampage, more than half had no time to react and died where they were dancing, according to a police report obtained by the Orlando Sentinel.

MORE: Full coverage of the Pulse shooting

There were 20 victims on the dance floor, three on stage, one in the front lobby and one on the patio, according to a 78-page presentation Orlando's police chief has given to law enforcement groups around the world.

The remaining 13 were found in two bathrooms after a three-hour hostage standoff with Omar Mateen. The gunman had barricaded himself in one of the bathrooms for most of that time, the Sentinel story says.

Related: Orlando to buy Pulse nightclub for $2.25M, turn it into memorial

The final death toll was 49, including 11 who died at hospitals or the triage areas outside the club. Another 58 were injured and treated at area hospitals. It was not known if any of the victims were struck by police bullets. Mateen was killed by police.

The presentation by Police Chief John Mina also includes critical analysis and suggestions on how the department might approach similar scenarios in the future.

• More from the Orlando Sentinel


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