Bills seek pain prescription limits and help for addicted babies


A bipartisan effort to combat the opioid epidemic is underway in Tallahassee with lawmakers having filed five bills that address the crisis from multiple fronts.

PrescriptionsSB 458, filed by Sen. Aaron Beach, R-Jacksonville, would limit opioid prescriptions for temporary pain. The bill would allow a 30-day renewal of an opioid prescription after the initial seven-day prescription.

The bill also requires doctors to consult the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, known as the PDMP, before prescribing controlled substances and to complete a two-hour course on prescribing opioids in order to renew their licenses.

Under the bill, physicians would also be required to complete an extensive medical history and physical exam on patients before prescribing opioid painkillers.

The patient’s medical record must document the nature and intensity of the pain, current and past treatments for pain, the effect the pain has on a patient’s physical and psychological function, a review of previous medical records and a history of alcohol and substance abuse.

Read the Post’s special report: Heroin, Killer of a Generation

Peer specialistsSB 450, filed by Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah, defines the role of peer specialists and requirements for certification. The bill defines peer specialists as addicts, alcoholics and others with mental illnesses who have been in recovery for at least two years and have passed a criminal background check.

Under the bill, the Department of Children and Families would create a training program for peer specialists. Services provided to those in recovery by peer specialists include assistance in getting a job, finding housing, education and life skills. Services would also by eligible for reimbursement by DCF and Medicaid.

Babies born addictedSB 434, filed by Sen. Kathleen Passidomo, R- Naples, would create a two-year pilot program to treat babies born addicted to opioids, called neonatal abstinence system. The program would be located at a nonprofit medical facility in southwest Florida that accepts Medicaid.

The facility would also be required to offer “residential-type accommodations” to the mother. The facility can require the mother to be drug tested — including testing her breast milk if she is nursing. If she refuses to be tested, she must leave the facility. Treatment will not exceed six months.

Fee added to bailHB 253, filed by Rep. Kimberly Daniels, D-Jacksonville, would impose a $10 fee attached to bail set for certain drug and alcohol-related offenses. The fee would be used for grants to small counties to combat drug abuse.

Counties with populations under 50,000 could use the grant money for drug enforcement training, equipment, salaries and cleanup at drug-manufacturing sites, such as meth labs. Twenty-six of Florida’s 57 counties had populations under 50,000 in 2016, according to state demographic data.

Involuntary treatmentSB 202, filed by Sen. Greg Steube, R-Sarasota, would revise the criteria for involuntary treatment for drug abuse. Under the bill, addicts who have been revived from an overdose with naloxone, also known as Narcan, could be involuntarily committed to a hospital or detox facility for up to 72 hours.



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