Opinion: Maybe GOP is now the party of louts and dunces


Just a couple of weeks ago, it seemed that the Republican Party had thrown in the towel on maintaining any sort of Donald Trump-free identity. Sen. Jeff Flake announced that, rather than defy the Trump-supporting base in Arizona, he would not seek re-election. He followed Sen. Bob Corker’s path. Sen. Ted Cruz, who, in a different universe, had stood tall at the Republican convention in Cleveland, responded to the small chorus of Trump critics in the Senate (Corker, John McCain and Flake) by growling that his fellow senators should “shut up and do (their) job.”

Now, in the aftermath of the elections in Virginia, New Jersey and elsewhere, people are asking whether Trumpism can prevail “without Trump.”

Laura Ingraham rushed to explain Ed Gillespie’s Virginia loss as a result of too little, not too much, Trump flavor in the mix. He “played footsie with conservative populism, but didn’t embrace it. Big mistake.” Trump himself tweeted, “(Gillespie) worked hard but did not embrace me or what I stood for.”

But Gillespie did very well with the central and western voters in Virginia who had gone for Trump. His trouble was that Virginia Democrats were burning to rebuke the president and his party. Voters who wanted to express disapproval of President Trump outnumbered those who wanted to support him by a 2-1 margin. Sixty percent of Virginia voters said they had a negative view of the Republican Party, and Democratic turnout was up 4 points over 2013.

In a hint of what Democratic turnout may look like when the party is no longer saddled with Hillary Clinton, Ralph Northam did better among almost every demographic than Clinton had. He won 61 percent of women, compared with 56 for Clinton. He won 69 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds, compared with Clinton’s 54 percent. He won 60 percent of college graduates, while Clinton won 55 percent.

Besides loyalty to Trump himself, what is Trumpism 12 months after his election? Is a Trump nationalist supposed to be for a southern wall paid for by Mexico when Trump himself hasn’t taken a single step toward erecting it or extorting that payment? Is a Trumpian expected to support deporting minor children of illegal immigrants as Trump promised in his campaign, or letting them stay, as Trump agreed with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to do? Shall a Trumpian demonize trade though Trump has done nothing (thank God) so far to launch trade wars?

Trumpism seems to be a personality cult built around a particularly unappealing personality, and little more.

Trump’s Rasputin, Steve Bannon, seems convinced that nastiness is the secret sauce. He was for Gillespie’s primary challenger, Corey Stewart, who ran on worshipping Confederate statues, labelling his opponents “cucks” and locking up illegal immigrants.

Bannon has been beating his toy drum about backing challengers to “establishment” Republicans. So far, he’s outfitted Michael Grimm, just out of prison on a tax-fraud conviction; Tom Tancredo, who called Barack Obama a bigger threat than al-Qaida; and Roy Moore, who thinks parts of Illinois — or maybe Indiana — labor under sharia law and hasn’t read the part of the U.S. Constitution that prohibits religious tests, if he’s read any of it.

Though these strivers cannot be said to espouse a consistent philosophy, they are united in their crudeness, ignorance and sheer jackassery. Republicans should be asked whether this is what Trumpism amounts to, and if so, whether they are happy to be counted as members of the louts and dunces party.

Writes for Creators Syndicate.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Letters: Time to admit it: Flagler changes were a mistake

Time to admit it: Flagler a mistake I agree with the writers regarding Flagler Drive and it being so unsightly. I travel the road two to four times a day. What really bothers me is that it is not being used by pedestrians, bike riders, etc. I have not seen a total of more than six people using the blocked-off road. To top it off, I have seen bike riders...
Editorial cartoon
Editorial cartoon

CARTOON VIEW JACK OHMAN
POINT OF VIEW: Avoiding family conflicts around the holiday table

With Thanksgiving just ahead and Christmas, Hanukkah and other winter celebrations around the corner, most of us are thinking about enjoying the season in the company of family and close friends. But, given today’s contentious political environment, many are also mindful of how political arguments can turn a family celebration into a very uncomfortable...
Christie commentary: Moore puts evangelical hypocrisy on full display
Christie commentary: Moore puts evangelical hypocrisy on full display

Editor’s note: An abridged version of this column appeared earlier on the Post’s Opinion Zone blog . Apparently, there is no more moral test for political candidates … There is only hypocrisy. That’s about the only conclusion you can come to in the wake of the mounting sexual assault allegations against former Alabama...
POINT OF VIEW: District committed, but state budget key to teacher pay

I’d like to respond to Post reader Ernest Terrien’s Nov. 14 Letter to the Editor inquiring about the complete benefits package of a teacher with five years of experience. The average five-year teacher rated as highly effective earns $43,297 for a 196-day contract that includes six paid holidays. In addition to this base salary, teachers...
More Stories