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Letters Upgrade voter card to passport status


Upgrade voter card

to passport status

One of the most coveted documents in the world is a USA passport, presented with pride by the holders for its almost universal acceptance.

In stark contrast is our voter registration card, which is nothing more than an afterthought. As an elections clerk for a 10-year period, I experienced that occasionally a voter would hold out his or her card and the clerk would simply wave it off and request a driver’s license.

Upgrading the significance of the voter registration card to where it would equal the stature of our passport would be of enormous value. For starters, the staff at each polling place could be cut in half by eliminating the bottleneck produced by four inspectors going through registration rolls to find the voter’s name and matching the signature on whatever photo ID is offered. Simply scanning the card and checking the photo on the card would reveal if the voter was eligible and had not already voted.

Our passport signifies that we are U.S. citizens. A properly issued voter registration card would reveal that we are citizens involved in performing the most vital duty of citizenship.

JERRY UTTER, LAKE WORTH

Trump’s rhetoric is

fueling anti-Semitism

A lady from Lake Worth writes in a letter to the editor, “Trump not behind rise in anti-Semitism” (Monday), finding it “deplorable that The Palm Beach Post blames Trump for the increase in anti-Semitism in this country.”

I am sorry, madam. The Post is not to blame. The president is.

We are all responsible for the words we use. Leaders and hopeful leaders are especially responsible since their words are very powerful and can incite people to do terrible things. As he has proven over the length of his campaign and since occupying the White House, he has consistently called upon people to “throw people out” of his events. He likes Jews “because they are good with money.” He dislikes Mexicans because they are “thieves and murderers,” and he thinks Muslims should be banned from entering the United States if they come from specific countries.

He has created an atmosphere where those inclined to violence — and unfortunately there are way too many — react and take their hatred out on these people, and, in this case, the people of Jewish faith by desecrating their homes, their temples and their cemeteries.

This president is equally responsible when he fails to use his office and his words to heal the wounds created by a vicious campaign and bring the people of the country together.

BRUCE BRODSKY, BOYNTON BEACH

Questions abound

re: loss of coverage

While watching the current health care debate, I have more questions than answers.

I am fortunate enough to be on Medicare and have a concierge doctor. This whole thing doesn’t directly affect me, or does it?

I’ve read the Congressional Budget Office has estimated that 24 million people will lose insurance if this passes as is. Even if the CBO is incorrect and in error by say, 10 million people, where are the remaining 14 million people going to get medical care? When people are sick and don’t have insurance, they go to emergency rooms. Emergency room care is extremely expensive.

Patients who have health insurance have preventive care and are seen regularly by doctors. They have far fewer ER visits. Are hospitals going to be turning away indigent sick people? These people will be sicker and require more care because they didn’t have proper prior care in the first place.

If not us taxpayers, who then, pays?

FRAN COCKERHAM, JUPITER



Reader Comments ...


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