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Letters Seems to me widening Northlake must come before extending SR 7


Seems to me widening

Northlake comes first

I read the editorial, “City should stop fighting needed SR7 road addition” (Wednesday), which recaps The Palm Beach Post’s position stated previously. One thing that caught my eye was the presumed need for this north-south corridor when the supposed new construction shows an east-west need. How is this going to relieve the problem?

For the past 15 years, no new construction has occurred along the Northlake corridor out west. New construction such as Avenir and others are just talking at this stage with not even a shovel raised.

The real need would be to widen Northlake Boulevard first, but even that has limits due to the adjacent Grassy Waters on both sides of the road.

What this really is all about is residents in The Acreage wanting to get traffic out of the Coconut Corridor that now flows to Northlake Boulevard. Nobody seems to be happy until Northlake turns into another traffic-ridden Okeechobee Boulevard.

This entire matter strikes me as a developer-planned agenda to profit on our residents’ backs.

BRETT SORGE, WEST PALM BEACH

Fight disease-carrying

mosquitoes with bats

Why has no one started putting up bat houses with the Zika situation? No mention in the news has ever suggested this as being a help.

We know bats feed on mosquitoes and some bat houses here and there certainly would help take care of millions of the biting things. People don’t use common sense but resort to using harmful sprays, which cause other health problems.

Get busy and try a simple solution for the problem.

FRANCES GRIFFIN, LAKE PARK

Let Trump besmirch

a D.C.-area golf course

Winter is over. Surely, there must be some “golfable” courses outside Washington, D.C., by this point in the year.

Let President Trump use those for a change, and get off the government dole for his weekly Florida golf fix.

MOLLY BERNARD, GREENACRES

United’s profit motive

undignified, inhumane

We have assumed that we live under a system of human dignity and honor within our society and within the realm of how corporations interact with us as individuals.

That said, with nothing better to do after praying at Easter Mass, I pulled up United Airline’s 37,000-word “Contract of Carriage” and read through Rule 21 (Refusal of Transport) and Rule 24 (Flight Delays/…).

I did not see any rule or regulation stating that a paid, seated passenger may be denied their seat based on that premise, or any other reason, including flight personnel planning failures.

Yes, you may be denied transport (CoC, Rule 21) if you are doing something obnoxious, but there is no rule for taking a paid, seated and docile passenger and physically harming them just to rectify a corporate scheduling error, such as not having the proper crew in another airport for another flight. There is no such rule.

Our moral contract assumes that “Mr. Corporation” will look out for our general welfare. And when we buy (rent) space on a plane for a short duration, there is an expectation that we’ll actually get to benefit from that transaction without bodily harm, bloodletting or unscheduled dental work.

It is extremely clear that the interest of Mr. Corporation is not us but merely profit, and at any cost.

Let’s hope that at the end of this legal sojourn, we are flying Dr. Dao Airlines.

MARTY GRIVJACK, JUPITER

Editor’s note: The name of the passenger forcibly ejected from the United flight on April 9 was Dr. David Dao.



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