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Letters: Safety a concern for Brightline trains? Seemingly not


Safety a concern?

Seemingly not

All the bloviating from All Aboard Florida regarding safety being its No. 1 concern went straight out the trains’ windows as soon as the Florida Legislature proposed regulations for high-speed trains that would make fencing and other safety conditions a requirement to protect people and animals from the threat of high-speed trains running through densely populated areas, such as are along its tracks in Palm Beach and Martin counties (“High-speed train bill could stall All Aboard Florida’s Brightline,” Tuesday).

Local residents have walked across the tracks in Jupiter for years to reach stores. Adults with children making their way often carrying bags of groceries are not uncommon.

Does “All About Money” care about the danger to these people? Apparently not. Big surprise.

RICHARD APPLE, TEQUESTA

Will Trump get share

of tourist bump, too?

County Commissioner Dave Kerner has enlisted the aid of County Attorney Denise Nieman to find a way to tax President Donald Trump for the added costs involved in visiting what’s been termed the winter White House (“Official: Tax Mar-a-Lago owner to help pay for cost of Trump visits,” Tuesday).

I naturally assume that Kerner is also exploring ways in which to share with Trump the additional tourist dollars that have flowed into Palm Beach County since Trump became a candidate and now president. Seems only fair to me.

JIM RICH, JUPITER

Politicians far behind

real curve of change

Best of luck to our grandkids. A little more than 100 years ago, 98 percent of all Americans lived and worked in rural, mostly agricultural communities. Today, only 2 percent of this population remains.

This was the result of modernization, a move away from labor-intensive agriculture to urban industrialization, which broadly improved productivity through the manufacture of new products.

Yet another, even more, productive revolution is underway, one that transcends our current preoccupation with the internet of things. True artificial intelligence, working in concert with interactive robotic devices, will dramatically alter what is currently considered labor and how it will be compensated.

Politicians like Donald Trump and those of his ilk are the reactionaries of what was, not what will soon be. Today they simply tout bringing back manufacturing jobs to boost the fortunes of the middle class.

Many forms of manual and intellectual labor will always be required, but soon a wide variety of highly intelligent robotic devices, working and interacting as teams, will eliminate a broad spectrum of physical labor now required for industrial manufacturing, construction, fast-food service and even medical diagnosis. We are talking about eliminating the need for many millions of workers who are now fully employed.

So how will advanced societies like America’s adjust? Will we shorten workweeks but not the salaries, equate nearly all work as equal (a floor sweeper and construction site manager both work, provide a service, therefore they earn the same wage)?

These are not the issues that politicians address. They are always encumbered with the task of improving what soon will no longer be.

ROBERT REGA, GREENACRES

If GOP plan is great,

let’s see them sign on

If the GOP health care plan is so good, why don’t the members in both houses use it? The Affordable Care Act may not have been the best, but it is working. It just needs to be tweaked.

SIMON BERGER, GREENACRES



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