Letters Dragging passenger off United flight was abomination


Dragging passenger

off was abomination

The archaic rules regarding overbooking were created when U.S. airlines were making very little money. United Airlines made $2.3 billion last year. Dragging a passenger off the plane because it’s within their right to do so is just plain stupid. No one took the $800 offer. Double it then. Triple it if that doesn’t work. Someone will take advantage of the offer at that level. The lame, backhanded apology of United’s chief executive shows his lack of common sense. I applaud the passengers on the flight who were critical of the United employees who stood idly by while this atrocity occurred.

FRED MORLOK, JUNO BEACH

Writer more concerned

with perp than victim

The writer of “20 years too harsh for teen’s sentence” (April 11) doesn’t agree with a judge’s decision to sentence a young criminal to 20 years. The now-17-year-old stole a car and then killed a woman who happened to be in his path. He was 15 years old at the time.

Where is the letter-writer’s sympathy for the victim’s family? She is more concerned about this youth’s loss of freedom than a family’s unnecessary loss of a loved one. When you are the victim of a crime, your perspective changes on treatment of the offender. I hope the writer never has to endure such pain.

BRIAN BERMAN, LAKE PARK

Mast must support

NIH cancer research

Eliminating death and suffering from cancer means everything to the millions of Americans with the disease and the people who love them. That’s why, as Congress completes work on the 2017 budget at the end of this month, I hope Rep. Brian Mast, R-Palm City, will support an increase in cancer research funding at the National Institutes of Health.

Right now, we are at a point where advancements in research are saving more lives than ever and it’s critical that we keep this momentum going forward.

More than 1.7 million people will be newly diagnosed with cancer this year and all of them will be relying on research to treat it. As a cancer volunteer and advocate, I hope Congress continues the strong bipartisan support for cancer research funding to maximize our potential for progress against a disease that still kills 1,650 people a day in this country.

None of us is more than one degree from someone with cancer — whether it’s a friend, family member or we’ve been diagnosed ourselves. For the 15.5 million cancer survivors and their families in this country, we must continue to fund research and fuel the hope to end cancer as we know it.

MELISSA DUFF, JUPITER

End double standard;

brain dead is brain dead

There appears to be an obvious common-sense double standard in The Post’s article, “Caretakers ponder: Is killing mercy?” (April 9). Mercy killings are predicated upon the fact that the victim is in a demented state where the function of that brain is no longer in control of the body — in a sense a body without a fully functioning brain, a common form of “brain dead.”

It is quite peculiar that we all rally around the poor individual of the stroke or trauma to the brain, discussing the option of “pulling the plug,” after all, he will never be able to feed himself, recognize family members or recover. Yet “pulling the plug” on a loved one with the same nonfunctioning brain is regarded as barbaric and immoral. Both families suffer whether it’s dementia or traumatic. Perhaps we need to provide the same options and do away with these strange double standards.

JAMES NESS, LAKE WORTH



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