Letters Bak is public, but most of its kids come from private wealth


Bak is public, but kids

are from private wealth

Now that a visit from the American and Chinese first ladies has brought Bak Middle School of the Arts into the limelight, I’d like to comment on something that has always bothered me about this publicly funded school. The fact is that there doesn’t seem to be any household income limits for families whose children attend this school.

I know many people who have the resources and have given their children private lessons, who have children who attend or have attended this school — along with Dreyfoos School of the Arts. Wouldn’t our tax dollars be better spent serving the children in our community who have the same dream but not the resources to do the same?

ANN MALACHOWSKI, TEQUESTA

Namesake wrong on

North Korea response

It seems that I have an alter ego who goes by the same name; see the article, “Trump’s right; U.S. must fight to win,” (Tuesday). While I’m certain that we both must agree on some issues, we clearly do not agree on what actions constitute a viable response to North Korea’s flaunting of its nuclear program and developing missile delivery systems going against accepted international norms. It seems to me that labeling North Korea a “bully,” as does my namesake, vastly oversimplifies a complex geopolitical relationship involving many actors, including China. Simply pushing back against a bully will not solve the problem.

Since my namesake offers Israel as an example, I would remind him of the numerous ways in which that nation gathers intelligence, cultivates alliances that go well beyond the U.S.-Israel connection and chooses its moment. While bulldozing homes in response to rocket attacks often makes headlines, we don’t hear about the back-channel relationships that result in positive outcomes that don’t involve taking on “the bully” directly. The smart application of pressure often eliminates the need for direct confrontation. Think of “The Godfather.”

Nuclear confrontation ought to be a last resort, not an opening gambit.

NORMAN S. KAUFMAN, LAKE WORTH

Editor’s note: In fact, there are two Norman Kaufmans in Lake Worth. Our April 11 correspondent was Norman R., though his initial was not indicated in his signature that accompanied that letter.

Does Trump’s 180

outrage his voters?

I read a recent letter in The Palm Beach Post, “Who profits from use of Tomahawks?” (Tuesday), and if the quoted cost of the Tomahawk missiles is correct, I am appalled at this misuse of power and spending. There was apparently no thought to apprising Congress, even though in 2013, President Barack Obama sought the approval of Congress, and was turned down. Then, as if Congress had no say in the matter, the Republicans continued to blame the former president for not following through on his “red line.”

The current president had consistently stated during the campaign that he would not interfere in the Middle East, that NATO is “obsolete” and “America First” was the theme of his comments. But, without congressional approval and with prior notification to Russia, he and his minions decided on an airstrike on a Syrian airbase. Bashar al-Assad’s atrocious bombings have been going on for years. The babies have been dying for years, and yet the Republicans saw no need to defend them.

There is money for a misguided and expensive air attack, but no money for education, the EPA, health care, etc. What happened to “America First”? Are those who voted for the current president not outraged by his lies to them during the campaign?

SHARON GARLAND, HOBE SOUND



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