Krauthammer: The guardrails can’t contain Trump


The pleasant surprise of the First 100 Days is over. The action was hectic, heated, often confused, but well within the bounds of normalcy.

Donald Trump’s character — volatile, impulsive, often self-destructive — had not changed since the campaign. But it seemed as if the guardrails of our democracy — Congress, the courts, the states, the media, the Cabinet — were keeping things within bounds.

Then came the last 10 days. The country is now caught in the internal maelstrom that is the mind of Donald Trump. We are in the realm of the id. Chaos reigns. No guardrails can hold.

Normal activity disappears. North Korea’s launch of an alarming new missile and a problematic visit from the president of Turkey (locus of our most complicated and tortured allied relationship) barely evoke notice. Nothing can escape the black hole of a three-part presidential meltdown.

— First, the firing of James Comey. Trump, consumed by the perceived threat of the Russia probe to his legitimacy, executes a mindlessly impulsive dismissal of the FBI director. He then surrounds it with a bodyguard of lies — attributing the dismissal to a Justice Department recommendation — which his staff goes out and parrots. Only to be undermined and humiliated when the boss contradicts them within 48 hours.

— Second, Trump’s divulging classified information to the Russians. A stupid, needless mistake. But despite the media hysteria, hardly an irreparable national security calamity.

Once again, however, the cover-up far exceeded the crime.

— Is it any wonder, therefore, that when the third crisis hit on Tuesday night — the Comey memo claiming that Trump tried to get him to call off the FBI investigation of Michael Flynn — Republicans hid under their beds rather than come out to defend the president? The White House hurriedly issued a statement denying the story. The statement was unsigned.

Republicans are beginning to panic. One sign is the notion now circulating that, perhaps to fend off ultimate impeachment, Trump be dumped by way of 25th Amendment.

That’s the post-Kennedy assassination measure that provides for removing an incapacitated president on the decision of the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet.

This is the worst idea since Leno at 10 p.m. It perverts the very intent of the amendment. It was meant for a stroke, not stupidity; for Alzheimer’s, not narcissism.

I thought we had progressed beyond the Tudors and the Stuarts. Moreover, this would be seen by millions as an establishment usurpation to get rid of a disruptive outsider. It would be the most destabilizing event in American political history — the gratuitous overthrow of an essential constant in American politics, namely the fixedness of the presidential term (save for high crimes and misdemeanors).

Trump’s behavior is deeply disturbing but hardly surprising. His mercurial nature is not the product of a post-inaugural adder sting at Mar-a-Lago. It’s been there all along. And the American electorate chose him nonetheless.

What to do? Strengthen the guardrails. Redouble oversight of this errant president. Follow the facts, especially the Comey memos. And let the chips fall where they may.

But no tricks, constitutional or otherwise.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Letters: Time to admit it: Flagler changes were a mistake

Time to admit it: Flagler a mistake I agree with the writers regarding Flagler Drive and it being so unsightly. I travel the road two to four times a day. What really bothers me is that it is not being used by pedestrians, bike riders, etc. I have not seen a total of more than six people using the blocked-off road. To top it off, I have seen bike riders...
Editorial cartoon
Editorial cartoon

CARTOON VIEW JACK OHMAN
POINT OF VIEW: Avoiding family conflicts around the holiday table

With Thanksgiving just ahead and Christmas, Hanukkah and other winter celebrations around the corner, most of us are thinking about enjoying the season in the company of family and close friends. But, given today’s contentious political environment, many are also mindful of how political arguments can turn a family celebration into a very uncomfortable...
Christie commentary: Moore puts evangelical hypocrisy on full display
Christie commentary: Moore puts evangelical hypocrisy on full display

Editor’s note: An abridged version of this column appeared earlier on the Post’s Opinion Zone blog . Apparently, there is no more moral test for political candidates … There is only hypocrisy. That’s about the only conclusion you can come to in the wake of the mounting sexual assault allegations against former Alabama...
POINT OF VIEW: District committed, but state budget key to teacher pay

I’d like to respond to Post reader Ernest Terrien’s Nov. 14 Letter to the Editor inquiring about the complete benefits package of a teacher with five years of experience. The average five-year teacher rated as highly effective earns $43,297 for a 196-day contract that includes six paid holidays. In addition to this base salary, teachers...
More Stories