You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myPalmBeachPost.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myPalmBeachPost.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myPalmBeachPost.com.

AP FACT CHECK: Trump ignores 100-day high achievers


President Donald Trump's claim Tuesday that he's accomplished more than anyone at this point of a presidency flies in the face of history.

A look at a few of his statements at a Wisconsin tool company and an earlier interview with Fox:

TRUMP: "No administration has accomplished more in the first 90 days." — At Snap-on headquarters, Kenosha, Wisconsin.

THE FACTS: Trump's legislative victories are minor, surpassed by those of a variety of high achievers in the White House. The concept of a president's first 100 days (a benchmark Trump reaches next week) started with Franklin Roosevelt, because he got so much done.

Taking office in the Great Depression, Roosevelt quickly declared a banking holiday to quiet panic, called a special session of Congress and won passage of emergency legislation to stabilize the banking system. He came forward with a flurry of consequential legislation that set the pillars of the New Deal in place within his first 100 days, "the most concentrated period of U.S. reform in U.S. history," say Alan Brinkley and Davis Dyer in "The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency." No fewer than 14 historic laws were enacted in that time.

Trump's big agenda items, like his promised tax overhaul and infrastructure plan, have yet to reach Congress. His attempt to secure the borders from people from terrorism-prone regions is so far blocked by courts. And his first attempt to repeal and replace President Barack Obama's health care law failed in Congress.

Trump needn't look as far back as FDR to see a president who got off to a consequential start. Obama signed a $787 billion stimulus package into law in his first month, while also achieving a law expanding health care for children and the Lilly Ledbetter bill on equal pay for women in that time.

Like FDR, Obama came to office in an economic crisis, the worst since the Depression. Lawmakers from both parties were inclined to act quickly and did, even as they fought over the details of the big stimulus package that defined Obama's early days.

___

TRUMP: "I didn't soften my stance" on China. "Nobody's ever seen such a positive response on our behalf from China, and then the fake media goes 'Donald Trump has changed his stance on China.' I haven't changed my stance. China's trying to help us." — Fox interview.

THE FACTS: It's hard to imagine a clearer switch in positions than the president's abandonment of his campaign pledge to declare China a currency manipulator, a move that would have set the stage for trade penalties. China had once devalued its currency to make its exports artificially cheaper, crowding out other countries' products, but in recent years has let market forces do more to shape currency exchange rates. Even as Trump railed against Chinese currency manipulation in the presidential campaign, there already were signs that China was taking steps to keep the value of the yuan from sinking further against the dollar.

Trump didn't let go of his accusation easily. As recently as April 2 he told The Financial Times that the Chinese are "world champions" of currency manipulation.

___

TRUMP, speaking about fellow NATO members, says he wants to "make sure these countries start paying their bills a little bit more; you know, they're way, way behind." — Remarks in Kenosha.

THE FACTS: That's an oversimplification of NATO financial obligations. NATO members are not in arrears on payments. They committed in 2014 to ensuring that by 2024, they would be spending 2 percent of their gross domestic product on their military budgets. Most NATO countries are spending less than that now, and Washington is putting pressure on them to do more.

In any event, the commitment is for these nations to spend more on their own military capabilities, which would strengthen the alliance, not to hand over money.

___

Associated Press writers Jim Drinkard and Robert Burns contributed to this report.

___

Find all AP Fact Checks here: http://apne.ws/2kbx8bd

EDITOR'S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figures


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Analysis: The investigation of Jared Kushner fits a very troubling pattern
Analysis: The investigation of Jared Kushner fits a very troubling pattern

Jared Kushner has just been revealed as the senior White House adviser who is under investigation in the Russia probe - which is news that comes as little surprise. Indeed, when The Washington Post reported last week that a then-unnamed top Donald Trump adviser was a focus, many quickly assumed it was Kushner.   But while those assumptions...
Medical marijuana in Palm Beach County? Rules coming soon
Medical marijuana in Palm Beach County? Rules coming soon

Thinking legislators in Tallahassee would come up with some statewide guidelines on the sale of medical marijuana, Palm Beach County officials held off on writing their own ordinance. But this year’s session came and went, and no such statewide guideline emerged. So, the county is moving ahead on its own. “We are working on an ordinance...
In Brussels, Trump appears to push aside prime minister of Montenegro
In Brussels, Trump appears to push aside prime minister of Montenegro

Pity tiny Montenegro.   The Balkan state is in the process of formally joining NATO, but membership, it seems, does not earn it a spot at the front of the line.   Video footage of world leaders at a NATO summit in Brussels on Thursday shows President Donald Trump appearing to push his way past the Montenegrin prime minister, Dusko...
What Rick Scott did in Boca Raton today could help your pocketbook
What Rick Scott did in Boca Raton today could help your pocketbook

Gov. Rick Scott signed a $180 million package of tax cuts here Thursday and offered few clues on whether he’ll veto an $83 billion state budget or an education bill opposed by the Palm Beach County School Board and many educators. Scott visited the motorcycle- and guitar-decorated headquarters of the mobile marketing company 3Cinteractive to...
Dem endorsement derby: Gwen Graham adds two from Palm Beach County
Dem endorsement derby: Gwen Graham adds two from Palm Beach County

Former U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia last year. Florida’s Democratic primary is 15 months away, but the endorsement primary is well underway in the race for governor.
More Stories