Roy Moore losing money race to Democrat in Alabama Senate contest

Democrats have given Doug Jones $8.1 million more than donors to his embattled Republican rival Roy Moore in the period from Oct. 1 through Nov. 22, according to Senate disclosure reports filed Monday.


Fundraising by Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore is lagging behind that of his Democratic rival Doug Jones as Democrats flood the race with money in hopes of stealing a victory as the special election campaign for the seat enters the final stretch. 

Democrats have given Jones $8.1 million more than donors to his embattled rival in the period from Oct. 1 through Nov. 22, according to disclosure reports filed with the U.S. Senate Monday. 

Jones reported $9.8 million in contributions and $8.4 million in spending He had $2.5 million in his campaign account in the closing days before the election, which is Dec. 12. That compares to fundraising of $1.7 million for Moore and spending of the same amount. Moore's campaign had $636,046 on hand. 

Moore, 70, allegedly initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old, sexually assaulted a 16-year old, and pursued other teenage girls romantically when he was in his 30s. Moore denies the allegations. 

Jones had a lead of 3 percentage points over Moore among likely voters — within the margin of error — according a poll released Dec. 2 by the Washington Post and the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University. 

President Donald Trump endorsed Moore Monday. "We need Republican Roy Moore to win in Alabama," he wrote in a tweet. 

The White House also confirmed Monday that Trump had spoken to Moore. "The president had a positive call with Judge Roy Moore during which they discussed the state of the Alabama Senate race and the president endorsed Judge Moore's campaign," Raj Shah, the principal deputy press secretary, said in a statement. 

Trump's move runs counter to many other Republican leaders who have repudiated Moore and called on him to exit the race. The president plans to hold a campaign-style rally on Friday in Pensacola, Florida, near the Alabama border. 

Many in the party's Washington leadership worry Moore could taint 2018 Republican candidates, which is one of the reasons they withdrew support from him days after the allegations surfaced. If Jones were to win in a state that traditionally heavily favors Republicans, Democrats would need to gain just two more seats in 2018 to retake the Senate. 

Moore received a small number of contributions earmarked through the Senate Conservatives Fund and the Club for Growth, the bulk of which came before the first reports of the sexual misconduct allegations. He raised $861,415 from small donors and received $51,950 from political action committees. 

Jones raised almost $5.8 million from small donors — those giving $200 or less — and $150,202.99 from political action committees. Virtually all of his money during the period was funneled to him through ActBlue, the Democratic online fundraising platform. 

Outside groups are also spending on the race. Richard Uihlein, one of the nation's top donors to conservative candidates and causes, gave $100,000 to the Proven Conservative PAC, which supports Moore, disclosures filed last week show. 

That money made Uihlein the group's top donor and triggered calls from Democrats that other Republicans who have taken Uihlein's money should return the funds because of the severity of the allegations against Moore.


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