breaking news

Florida Supreme Court to air hearings on Facebook Live

Palm Beach Symphony ‘nurtures soul’ of north county with expansion


As David McClymont started orchestrating the Palm Beach Symphony’s future, he realized everybody would benefit from the musicians working in closer harmony with the community.

The symphony began its outreach efforts about two years ago, starting with a campaign to collect instruments for schools that needed them. Top musicians started giving coaching sessions to young students, McClymont, the symphony’s executive director said.

Now, the symphony is expanding its presence into northern Palm Beach County with a 7:30 p.m. Jan. 27 performance at Benjamin Hall at The Benjamin Upper School, 4875 Grandiflora Rd., in Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets start at $25.

The full symphony’s performances have typically been in the historic venues of Palm Beach island.

Artistic and Music Director Ramón Tebar said people who think the symphony is only for the elite often find their prejudices dismantled when they hear the music for the first time. Music is “the universal language,” unlike art or literature, which can require a shared language or historical context to appreciate, he said.

“A society who doesn’t pay attention to its cultural inheritance is not nurturing its soul,” Tebar said.

The symphony is composed of about 70 to 90 musicians working together to produce the perfect natural sound, he said. Tebar will lead the performance of two romantic symphonies — Robert Schumann’s No. 1 and Johannes Brahms’ No. 4 — at next week’s concert.

Enjoying symphonic music, just like fine dining, requires time, Tebar said.

“What it needs is time for people to see it, to forget about the troubles of daily life, and just enjoy it and pay attention and concentrate,” he said.

Claudio Jaffe, primary cellist, said it’s “fantastic” the symphony is expanding beyond the island — and it’s time. One of the great aspects of the arts in America is that they’re primarily funded by the people rather than the government, he said.

“It’s something that belongs to the community, and it’s built by the community,” Jaffe.

Jupiter resident Leslie Blum can’t read music, but she can appreciate it. A board member and chair of the symphony’s development committee, she tried about a decade ago to bring performances to Jupiter. There wasn’t enough demand at that time.

The demographics of the symphony’s audience are changing, though, which McClymont chalks up to aggressive marketing and the success of community collaboration.

Supporters now come from as far south as Boca Raton and as far north as Stuart, he said. The symphony has quite a few followers in Jupiter and Palm Beach Gardens.

That’s good news to Blum.

“Music belongs in our life. It’s part of our culture,” she said. “I think people are missing it if they don’t listen and come to our concerts.”

Have a Palm Beach Gardens issue you’d like to see The Post tackle, or a story idea? Contact Sarah Peters at 561-820-4715 or speters@pbpost.com.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Deputies: 2 arrested after 3-month-old child, 51 pounds of heroin, found in SUV
Deputies: 2 arrested after 3-month-old child, 51 pounds of heroin, found in SUV

Deputies in Mississippi arrested two women Monday night on suspicion of drug trafficking after authorities said they found 51 pounds of heroin and a 3-month-old child in an SUV the women were driving. A deputy pulled over a Ford SUV on Interstate 20 in Rankin County on Monday night for an unspecified traffic violation. Authorities said that during...
Brightline train death: Video shows gates were down, police say
Brightline train death: Video shows gates were down, police say

A video taken from a camera on the front of Brightline’s locomotive shows the crossing gates were down when the company’s train struck and killed Jeffrey King as he rode his bike over the Florida East Coast Railway tracks in Boynton Beach last week, according to a police report released Tuesday. King, 51, of Boynton Beach, was...
Florida DA seeks death penalty in Tampa serial killings
Florida DA seeks death penalty in Tampa serial killings

Florida prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty for a 24-year-old man they say is responsible for randomly killing four people in a Tampa neighborhood will face the death penalty, according to news reports.  Howell Emanuel Donaldson III was charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of Benjamin Mitchell, 22; Monica Hoffa, 32; Anthony...
#BlackPantherChallenge sends internet into frenzy
#BlackPantherChallenge sends internet into frenzy

“Black Panther” is one of the most anticipated movies of the year, and thousands of children may have a chance to see it for free thanks to the #BlackPantherChallenge.  Earlier this month, Frederick Joseph, of New York, launched a GoFundMe to help students from the Boys & Girls Club of Harlem “see a black major cinematic...
Have your voice heard on the future of the Loxahatchee River
Have your voice heard on the future of the Loxahatchee River

Got concerns about public use on the Loxahatchee River and in the Lake Worth Creek Aquatic Preserve in north Palm Beach County? Your voice can be heard at a public meeting at 6 p.m. planned Jan. 29 at the Jupiter Community Center, 200 Military Tr. The meeting is free and open to the public.  The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is...
More Stories