Why did Trump compliment French first lady’s figure?

Because he is who he is — and she’s not what he expects a 64-year-old woman to look like


Brigitte Macron is in great shape. We can all see that.

The first lady of France is as buff as Speaker of the House Paul Ryan.

“You’re in such good shape,” President Trump told her Thursday during his first state visit to France, then he turned to her husband, French President Emmanuel Macron, and repeated: “She’s in such good physical shape.”

After Trump nodded approvingly and called her “beautiful,” Mrs. Macron appeared to take Melania Trump’s arm and step backward.

Clearly, she was surprised — and I suspect Trump was surprised, too.

The fact that Brigitte Macron is 64, beautiful and in great shape is beyond Trump’s notion of beauty.

If a flat-chested woman has “a hard time being a 10,” as Trump once said, what chance does a 64-year-old woman have, based on his pageant standards?

At least he didn’t say: “You’re in such good shape for your age.”

The fact that his comment is patronizing is obvious. There’s rarely an appropriate public forum to go googly over the physical attributes of a first lady.

When it comes from the 71-year-old leader of the free world — a man who’s clearly not in good shape — perhaps we can forgive it as a misdirected attempt at kindness.

He was responding to her the way he’s used to responding to women.

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When I interviewed Trump about the history of Mar-a-Lago for the Palm Beach County history book I edited in 2009, he greeted me with: “The Palm Beach Post has sent a beautiful one over this time.”

I took it as a compliment — why not? It was one part of an interesting conversation, and he was gracious, not googly.

His comments about Brigitte Macron are more notable to me because he reacted to what he did not expect to see.

She is a good example of why the “visual vocabulary” should change for people over 50.

This is one mission of Ageist, a two-year-old publishing and marketing movement based in Los Angeles. Its motto: “Live Fast Die Old.” Its purpose: To promote a “better understanding of later life styles.”

So many people over 50 are in such “good shape” today, they defy stereotypes — including France’s first lady.

“There’s this black hole of media visibility from age 35 to Betty White (95),” says Ageist founder David Harry Stewart.

Haven’t seen too many 64-year-olds who look like Brigitte Macron?

They’re out there.

Get used to it. Just keep your comments to yourself.



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