You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myPalmBeachPost.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myPalmBeachPost.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myPalmBeachPost.com.

breaking news

Woman accused in Delray officer’s death used drugs before crash

Olympics champ Laurie Hernandez: Why she wrote a memoir at age 16


Even at 16, Laurie Hernandez’s professional accomplishments are a lot to live up to. She’s an Olympic gold and silver-winning gymnast, the youngest-ever winner of “Dancing With The Stars”’ mirror ball trophy, and now a New York Times best-selling author.

But on the phone, the New Jersey native, who comes to town Friday for the Palm Beach Book Festival to promote her memoir “I Got This: To Gold and Beyond,” is a completely disarming and relatively normal teenager, whose excitement to be on the current cultural landscape is more about national and personal pride than preening.

RELATED: ROBERT WAGNER TO APPEAR AT BOOK FESTIVAL

“It was really special, honestly,” Hernandez says of being an Olympian. “There’s a little American flag embroidered on your leotard, so it’s important to see everyone cheering.”

Hernandez is the youngest American female gymnast to win an individual Olympic medal in more than 20 years (the most recent before her was 15-year-old Shannon Miller in 1992). She says she wanted to write a book because “I just wanted to share my story and share how I worked really hard to get where I am. I had some rough spots, but I was able to push forward and achieve my dream.”

RELATED: LITERARY STARS AT PALM BEACH BOOK FESTIVAL

Obviously, writing a book isn’t quite as much work as a lifetime of grueling physical training, but it wasn’t easy. In fact, “it was pretty hard!” Hernandez admits. “But I had the help of my mom, and all of my memories were in place. A lot of it I just remembered by heart, and the rest, I was constantly writing things down in competition.”

She says that her book, as well as her career, has been a family affair. Her parents, Anthony and Wanda, entered Laurie, the youngest of their three kids, in gymnastics when she was 6 at her request, after seeing then-Olympian Shawn Johnson on TV.

“I told my mom I had seen something that I thought was so powerful. She had such control. I was in awe of her. I pointed at her and said, ‘I want to be just like her,’” Hernandez says. “So they put me right in. That (choice) has been the backbone of everything I’ve done. It would be impossible to have done this without my family. This can be a rough sport.”

In the book, she writes about some of that roughness, including an incident in 2014 in which she dislocated her kneecap and fractured her wrist. Being protective parents, Hernandez says that they “asked me ‘Is this still something you want?’ I knew I wanted to do it, so I answered ‘Yes.’ They supported me whether I wanted to do it or not. It was my mother’s thought to bring me to the doctors, because I didn’t want to stop, and she said ‘No, honey, you really need to check that out.’ It was their job to keep me safe, and support me. I’m grateful.”

Gymnastics wasn’t her first sport — she writes in her memoir that her mother had “always wanted a karate kid,” but that wasn’t to be Laurie’s path. When she was tiny, “I started out doing ballet, but it was a little too serious for my age. Also, I realize they only had sugar cookies at the end of the workouts,” she says, laughing. “I don’t think I was ready for it.”

Still, she was able to use some of her dance training for what was to be her true career path as a gymnast. Much later, she got to meet Johnson, the woman who inspired her, and who is also a “DWTS” champion. “I still fangurl when I talk to her. She sparked that fire in me.”

Reaching the heights that Johnson, Hernandez, her teammate and current “DWTS” contestant Simone Biles and others have reached takes not only physical and mental dedication, but an incredible commitment of time and money from the athlete and their entire family. In her book, Hernandez emphasizes that although her childhood was highly focused, it was as normal as possible, something her parents made sure of.

“This was a struggle for my parents, making sure I still had a fun, playful childhood. They were stuck in some moments whether or not to support this thing that I was really passionate about, like ‘Do we really trust her?’ I was really young at the time,” she says. “But they really trusted me that I wanted what I did. I can’t thank them enough.”

There are times, however, that this passion took its toll, as with her injuries, or in an incident she describes in her book as “a breakdown,” when she blurts out in front of friends that she wasn’t sure her body would hold up with all the training. Including that incident, Hernandez says, was about showing fans “that I wasn’t just into gymnastics to get into the Olympics. I knew it wasn’t going to be all perfect, that it wouldn’t be easy. It’s more of a job than some fun, playful hobby. So it was important for me to show that every so often, you break down and evaluate why you started.”

She says she gets a reminder of that every time she meets little girls “who tell me ‘We started gymnastics because of you!’ That brings me back to that little girl watching gymnastics on TV. I think maybe I’m talking to the future generation of Olympians!”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Community

John Kasich shows off pop culture savvy on ‘The View’
John Kasich shows off pop culture savvy on ‘The View’

John Kasich famously referred to himself as the “only adult on the stage” during a presidential debate last year, but the Republican governor of Ohio also knows how to connect with teens, thanks to his pop culture knowledge. >> Read more trending news On Thursday, Kasich appeared on “The View” and gave his opinions about...
Bank forecloses on ‘Extreme Makeover’ homeowner in Michigan
Bank forecloses on ‘Extreme Makeover’ homeowner in Michigan

Nearly nine years ago, Arlene Nickless had her home rebuilt on national television. By Monday, she must turn in her keys and leave. >> Read more trending news Designers with ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” — helped by hundreds of volunteers — built her family's home in 2008 after the death of Tim Nickless...
Ariana Grande announces Manchester benefit concert
Ariana Grande announces Manchester benefit concert

Ariana Grande has broken her silence and has announced that she will put on a benefit concert for those affected by last week’s terror attack during her Manchester concert. >> Read more trending news Time, date and location information was not released in Friday afternoon’s tweet. The concert will be in honor of those killed and injured...
Hey, it’s all protein. You unwittingly eat insects all the time
Hey, it’s all protein. You unwittingly eat insects all the time

A friend once told me when he lived in the Middle East as a child, he would find cockroaches in his Cheerios and Frosted Flakes all the time.
7 hot stops for a daycation in Palm Beach
7 hot stops for a daycation in Palm Beach

Need a daycation? Skip the flight and the long drive. You live in Palm Beach County, my friend. That means you live a quick drive away from Palm Beach Island.... Where the palm trees make anyone with a smartphone an amateur photographer. Where the abundance of Teslas and Rolls Royces and Maseratis make the streets feel like a 24/7 car show. Where...
More Stories