Sandwich and wine for dinner? Yes, please, when they’re this good


Why don’t we make a sandwich our dinner more often? Especially when it’s as good as this poblano and chorizo torta? Congratulate yourself for your good sense with one of these three wines, all picked to stand up to the spicy heat.

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MAKE THIS 

CHORIZO TORTA 

Roast 1 large poblano over a hot grill, turning, until blackened all over. Rub off skin; discard stem and seeds. Chop pepper. Cook 1 pound Mexican chorizo sausage, casing removed, in a large, dry skillet set over medium heat, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, 5 minutes. Add 1 white onion, chopped, and 1/2 teaspoon oregano. Cook until onion has softened and sausage is done, about 5 minutes. Stir in chopped pepper. Divide mixture among 4 Mexican bolillos. Top with shredded Monterey Jack and sharp white cheddar. Squish and crisp sandwiches on a griddle. Makes: 4 servings 

Recipe by Leah Eskin 

DRINK THIS 

Pairings by sommelier Arthur Hon of Sepia, as told to Michael Austin: 

2015 Chateau Pey La Tour Rosé, Bordeaux, France: The two major flavors of this torta come from the poblano pepper and the chorizo sausage, which brings its own brand of spice and heat. To play off of the pepper flavors, here is a rosé with the pepper aromas inherent in some Bordeaux grape varieties. Also, the fresh acidity and natural weight of this rosé will match well with this rustic dish. 

2015 Pinuaga La Senda, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain: La Senda is an unoaked merlot blend with a touch of tempranillo, and like many Spanish wines, it has an affinity for the combination of meat, spices and a little heat. The naturally spiced flavors and fresh, fruity profile of the wine have the right amount of elegance and versatility to work with the direct flavors of this dish. Remember to serve the wine slightly chilled. 

2012 Domaine Dugois Arbois Savagnin Sous Voile, Jura, France: This wine has focused acidity along with a touch of spiced, oxidative notes in the form of cardamom, fenugreek and salted toffee. It’s a versatile wine for food with tricky spice or richer flavors — or food that’s too heavy for a traditional white and too light for red. The wine’s citruslike acidity and notes of dried stone fruits will match nicely with the dish.


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