Pesto in winter? Of course, and here are wines that match the richness


This rich pasta dish calls for bright and lively wines that will either complement the richness, cut through it or, in an ideal pairing, both. Any of these three wines— a Champagne, a gruner veltliner from Austria or a sauvignon blanc from California — will do the job nicely. 

 ——— 

 MAKE THIS 

 WINTER PESTO 

 With the food processor running, drop 3 cloves garlic down the chute, one by one, buzzing garlic to bits. Add 2 cups (loosely packed) parsley leaves and tender stems, 1/3 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese, 3/4 teaspoon coarse salt and 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice. Pulse a few times. With motor running, drizzle in 1/3 cup olive oil, swirling into a thick sauce. Tumble in 1 cup toasted walnuts. Pulse a few times, leaving pesto chunky. Toss the pesto in a serving bowl with 1 pound cooked spaghetti. Makes: 6 first course servings 

 Recipe by Leah Eskin 

 DRINK THIS 

 Pairings by sommelier Rachael Lowe of Spiaggia, as told to Michael Austin: 

 Delamotte Brut, Le Mesnil-sur-Oger, Champagne, France: This nonvintage sparkler has aromas of green apple, golden pear, almond skin and a hint of chamomile, which will work beautifully with the richness of the walnuts. The dish’s olive oil and herbal component will be balanced by the wine’s fine bubbles and bright acidity. 

 2016 Nigl Kremser Freiheit Gruner Veltliner, Kremstal, Austria: A blend of grapes from four high-elevation vineyards, this wine offers aromas of lime blossom, lemon, sage, white pepper and dried thyme, all balanced by high acidity. The wine’s herbal notes will complement the parsley, while the acidity will cut through the garlic, oil and walnut richness. 

 2016 Ziata Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley, California: Fermented in small, neutral barrels as well as stainless steel tanks, this wine is bright and aromatic. Intense aromas of lemongrass, under-ripe pineapple, lemon pith, orange rind and lime zest will add a citrus element to this already-vivid dish, while also balancing the rich cheese and olive oil.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Food

A quarter sheet pan is plenty big enough to hold all my love
A quarter sheet pan is plenty big enough to hold all my love

Nobody would mistake me for being hip and trendy. I have been wearing clogs - not the same pair, mind you - since the Ford administration. Yet I am YASSing and inserting heart emoji on behalf of the quarter sheet pan, which is surfing a wave of popularity. Deservedly so. There it is on social media, roasting a one-pan meal for two. Toasting a handful...
Just in: Funky French bar opens in Northwood Village  
Just in: Funky French bar opens in Northwood Village  

The spirit of the South of France has come to Northwood Village in the form of Pétanque Kitchen & Bar, a funky restaurant and lounge that aims to be thoroughly “unconventional.” That’s the description offered by co-owner Olivier Delrieu, who dreamed up the place with this brother, Edouard Delrieu, as a tribute to their childhood...
Local trend: Three fine dining restaurants offer new takeout lunch options
Local trend: Three fine dining restaurants offer new takeout lunch options

It’s a trend that pairs the posh with the pragmatic: local fine dining restaurants opening casual, grab-and-go counters.  Consider the newly opened market at Costa, the Mediterranean restaurant at the Esplanade plaza on Worth Avenue. The upscale, second-floor spot offers build-your-own bowls, sandwiches, salads, spreads, breads and...
Licorice is an acquired taste
Licorice is an acquired taste

Love is complicated and uncontrollable and easily misunderstood. You never know when it will strike. You probably thought it was yucky when you were a kid - but then a few years later, maybe you found yourself head over heels, swooning. You have to nurture it, grow it, explore the world with your love! Love is grand and difficult, all at once. My love...
Finding a lost strain of rice, and clues to slave cooking
Finding a lost strain of rice, and clues to slave cooking

Among the biologists, geneticists and historians who use food as a lens to study the African diaspora, rice is a particularly deep rabbit hole. So much remains unknown about how millions of enslaved Africans used it in their kitchens and how it got to those kitchens to begin with. That’s what made the hill rice in Trinidad such a find. The fat...
More Stories