Once you finally tackle a pomelo, you'll be so glad you did


If you are like me, you have been walking by the extra-large, grapefruitlike pomelos in the store for years, never feeling quite up for venturing into unknown citrus territory, especially when there are so many more familiar, less intimidatingly huge favorites to snap up this time of year. 

If that's the case then, like me, you have been missing out. 

Pomelos are wonderful! They taste something like grapefruit, with a pleasant tartness, but mellower - without much bitterness and with a sweet, candylike aroma. It is the largest, and one of the original, citrus species, but don't let the size deter you; the fruit inside is not much larger than that of a grapefruit. They are so big because their pith is quite thick, but it is easy enough to get to the tasty flesh within and enjoy just as you would a grapefruit or orange. 

This recipe uses the blush-colored pomelo segments in a classic, composed salad with crisp, thinly sliced fennel and red onion dressed simply in extra-virgin olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, topped with a crunch of toasted pistachios and mint leaves. It's a delightful dish that offers a refreshing contrast to winter's rich stews and roasts, and it is confirmation that there are always more healthful culinary delights to be discovered.

- - -

Krieger is a registered dietitian, nutritionist and author who hosts public television's "Ellie's Real Good Food." She blogs and offers a weekly newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.

- - -

Fennel Pomelo Salad With Pistachios

4 servings, Healthy 

Any type of orange or grapefruit would work here, but this recipe takes advantage of an often overlooked variety, pomelo. 

From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.

Ingredients

1 pomelo or red grapefruit

1/4 cup shelled, unsalted pistachios

1 to 2 large fennel bulbs, cored and thinly sliced (about 3 cups)

1/4 small red onion, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons plus 4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup packed fresh mint leaves

Steps

Cut the pomelo or red grapefruit into segments by slicing off the top and bottom of the fruit. Stand it on one flat end, then cut down the sides following the curve of the fruit to remove the peel and white pith. Working over a bowl, use a paring knife to detach the fruit segments from their membranes.

Toast the pistachios in a small, dry skillet over medium heat for about 5 minutes, until fragrant, shaking the pan to avoid scorching. Cool completely, then coarsely chop.

Toss the sliced fennel and onion with 2 tablespoons of the oil, the lemon juice, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Divide the mixture among individual plates, then top each with some citrus segments (reserve any accumulated juices for another use), the mint and toasted pistachios. Drizzle each portion with 1 teaspoon of the remaining oil and serve. 

Nutrition | Per serving: 190 calories, 3 g protein, 15 g carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 105 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 9 g sugar


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Food

Hidden gem: Chubby Salmon brings sushi, ramen to Jupiter
Hidden gem: Chubby Salmon brings sushi, ramen to Jupiter

I followed a recent weeknight whim to Chubby Salmon, a sushi and hibachi spot that’s tucked into a Jupiter strip plaza. On my way there, I passed a line that snaked outside Food Shack, located just doors away. Unlike its iconic neighbor, the sushi spot was virtually empty, its hibachi fires unlit. I should specify that it was empty of people...
It’s harder to make meals in the mountains
It’s harder to make meals in the mountains

A: Some foods take longer to cook by some methods at altitudes higher than 3,000 feet above sea level. But other foods actually take less time, according to the Department of Agriculture. The key factor is declining air pressure at higher altitudes. Falling air pressure lowers the boiling point of water by just under 1 degree Fahrenheit for each 500...
Highly processed foods linked to increased cancer risks
Highly processed foods linked to increased cancer risks

A diet of fizzy drinks, packaged baked goods, instant noodles, sugary cereals, candy and ready-made meals could raise your cancer risk.  So says a study in the British Medical Journal which has found an association between such “ultra-processed” foods — typically high in sugar, fat and salt but low in nutrition — and increased...
2 do-ahead fish soup bases make for easy dinner parties, just add garnishes 
2 do-ahead fish soup bases make for easy dinner parties, just add garnishes 

Restaurants have go-to recipes — ones the cook enjoys making and the guests order over and over again. At home, I turn to one-pot soups, stews and slow-cooker meals for the same reasons.   I like to prepare a couple of fish soup bases to make dinner parties easier. When the guests arrive, I can simply reheat the base, add some fresh...
Daisuke Nakazawa is opening a sushi restaurant in a Trump hotel
Daisuke Nakazawa is opening a sushi restaurant in a Trump hotel

On a recent Saturday afternoon, a sushi chef was admiring a portrait of Napoleon hanging in the National Gallery of Art. He was joking that in those white pants and vest, the French emperor looked like a chef. Perhaps he was laughing too loudly, because it caught the attention of a 26-year-old tourist from Dallas, who raced over with a glimmer of recognition...
More Stories