Instant Pot recipe: Korean Chile-Braised Brisket and Kimchi Coleslaw


Excerpted from “Dinner in an Instant” by Melissa Clark.

Korean Chile-Braised Brisket and Kimchi Coleslaw

4 to 5 pounds beef brisket, cut into 3 or 4 pieces

1 tablespoon dried red chile flakes, preferably Korean gochugaru

1 tablespoon sweet paprika

2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 to 3 tablespoons peanut or safflower oil, as needed

1 large onion, diced

4 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon grated peeled fresh ginger

1 cup lager-style beer

1/4 cup gochujang (Korean chile paste) or Sriracha

2 tablespoons ketchup

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons light or dark brown sugar

2 teaspoons Asian fish sauce

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Kimchi Coleslaw

Rub the beef with the chile flakes, paprika, salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour and up to 24 hours.

Set the electric pressure cooker to sauté (or use a large skillet). Add a tablespoon of the oil, let it heat up for a few seconds, and then add a batch of the beef and sear until it’s browned all over, about 2 minutes per side, adding more oil as needed. Transfer the beef to a plate and repeat with the remaining batches.

If the pot looks dry, add a bit more oil. Add the onion and sauté until golden, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté for 1 minute longer. Add the beer, gochujang, ketchup, soy sauce, brown sugar, fish sauce and sesame oil. Scrape the mixture into the pressure cooker if you have used a skillet.

Cover and cook on high pressure for 90 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally for 20 minutes, and then release the remaining pressure manually.

Transfer the beef to a plate or a rimmed cutting board and tent with foil to keep warm. Set the pressure cooker to sauté and simmer the sauce for 15 to 20 minutes, until it is reduced by half or two-thirds (remember that it thickens as it cools). Use a fat separator to skim off the fat, or let the sauce settle and spoon the fat off the top. Serve the sauce alongside the beef, with the kimchi coleslaw.

Kimchi Coleslaw: Combine 5 cups shredded cabbage, 1/4 cup chopped kimchi, 2 tablespoons peanut oil, 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil, the juice of 1/2 a lime and 1/2 teaspoon sea salt in a large bowl and toss well. Taste, and add more salt or lime juice if needed.

Makes 8 servings.

SOURCE: “Dinner in an Instant” by Melissa Clark. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.



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