Vero Beach: Sunrises not high-rises


Vero Beach

When looking for a beach escape, I want to see the sea, not towering condos and hotels that cast long shadows and block the sun. It’s one of the reasons I love Vero Beach, where zoning restrictions prevent buildings more than four stories tall. 

 “Our motto is ‘sunrises not high-rises,’” says Allison McNeal, a third-generation Veroite and director of tourism for the Indian River Chamber of Commerce.

Vero’s sunrises are spectacular. I’ve often witnessed them from guest rooms at such resorts as Costa d’Este, the seaside boutique hotel owned by music legends Gloria and Emilio Estefan, or the nearby Kimpton Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, a delightful hotel just north of Costa d’Este. Both offer beach views, upscale restaurants, pampering spas and fine service — and both are dog-friendly, a perk much appreciated by the tail-wagging Chihuahua who often travels with me.

The hotels aren’t the only places to deliver picture-postcard seaside views, however. There are oceanside restaurants where you can dine alfresco while enjoying the balmy sea breezes. One of my favorites is Citrus Grillhouse, with Mediterranean- and Italian-inspired dishes. 

 >> Related: Royal Caribbean Cruise ship travel tips

Another popular spot for lunch or dinner is the Ocean Grill, an Old Florida-style seafood and steakhouse restaurant known for its precarious perch over the ocean. A landmark, the building where the Ocean Grill is located was constructed 70 years ago by entrepreneur Waldo Saxton. It wasn’t converted to restaurant until 1941. In the 1920s, Saxton took a brawny team of mules to clear the right of way for A1A from the Sebastian Inlet to the south county line. He also cleared the road to the Ocean Grill.

While it’s tempting to spend all vacation time at the beach, Vero Beach has much more to offer. One of my favorite attractions is McKee Botanical Garden, favorite stomping grounds for locals and tourists since 1932 when Cleveland industrialist Arthur McKee and his partner Waldo Sexton (Yup, the same fellow who built the Ocean Grill) designed it. Back then, it was called McKee Jungle Gardens, home to lions, tigers, elephants and monkeys.

The critters are long gone, but visitors who follow winding paths through the 18 acres can see 100 different varieties of water lilies and more than 10,000 species of plants and trees. 

 To see more than 3,000 species of plants and animals, take a kayak or paddleboard trip through the Indian River Lagoon, the most biodiverse lagoon ecosystem in the Northern Hemisphere. Don’t be surprised if a dolphin swims by to say hello.

If Spanish fleets and sunken treasures intrigue you, you’ll want to know that last year $4.5 million in gold from the 1715 Treasure Fleet was found off the shores of Vero Beach. Want to know how they did it? Plan to visit McLarty Treasure Museum at Sebastian Inlet State Park. You’ll find weapons, coins and tools salvaged from the fleet of Spanish ships that sunk during the 1715 storm. 

 Another spot not to miss is Mel Fisher’s Treasure Museum, where you’ll find more authentic shipwreck treasures and one-of-kind jewelry. 

 Save some time to shop. From unique boutiques to upscale shops, opportunities for retail therapy abound. Check out shops along Ocean Drive, Village Shops on Route A1A, the World Bazaar & Antique Mall, the Vero Beach Outlets or downtown Vero, where Maria Sparsis’ Tea and Chi shop can be found.

Sparsis, a marine biologist born in Cyprus, says Vero Beach is just her cup of tea. 

 “I’ve lived a lot of places and never found such a welcoming sense of community,” says Sparsis, an artist whose works can be found across the street at Flametree Clay Art Gallery. “When I go to the grocery store I have to allow for time to chat with at least five people.” 

 And that’s just the way she likes it.  

 

Insider Tips:

• Pack your flip-flops, bathing suit and sunscreen so you can enjoy Vero’s 26 miles of uncrowded beaches. Parking is free. 

• Thirsty? Belly up to the bar at Orchid Island Brewery (2855 Ocean Drive), the city’s only microbrewery. The family-run pub serves tasty home-brewed ales steeped with Indian River citrus. 

WHERE TO STAY

Kimpton Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, 3500 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach, 772-231-5666 or 866-602-8376.

Costa d’Este Beach Resort & Spa, 3244 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach, 772-562-9919.

Driftwood Inn Vero Beach and Waldo’s Restaurant, 3150 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach, 772-231-0550. 

Disney’s Vero Beach, 9250 Island Grove Terrace, Vero Beach, 772-234-2000.

WHERE TO EAT

Citrus Grillhouse, 1050 Easter Lily Lane, Vero Beach; 772-234-4114. 

Ocean Grill, 1050 Beachland Blvd., Vero Beach, 772-231-5409.

The Crab Stop of Vero Beach, 2263 14th Ave., Vero Beach, 772-257-5221. 

WHAT TO SEE

Riverside Theatre, America’s largest small-town theater with Broadway shows, comedy and concert.

Vero Beach Museum of Art, truly a center of high-quality cultural education and enjoyment serving as the cultural heart of the area.

Mel Fisher’s Treasure Museum in nearby Sebastian where you can see shipwreck treasures and unique jewelry — or to go on a treasure-hunting dive yourself.


 

Don’t forget it. Pin it!


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

Familiar frights at these haunts
Familiar frights at these haunts

LOS ANGELES — Six years ago, director Eli Roth pulled on a costume from his film “Hostel” and staged an impromptu performance inside the film’s maze at Universal Studios’ Halloween Horror Nights.  “He showed up, he had the costume from the movie, and he acted in every single scene in the maze for over an hour...
Fall day trip: A bike ride between two Minnesota icons
Fall day trip: A bike ride between two Minnesota icons

Someday the Gitchi-Gami State Trail might extend 89 miles along Minnesota’s North Shore from Two Harbors to Grand Marais — a cyclist’s answer to the 310-mile Superior Hiking Trail.  Until that utopian vision comes to pass, the paved bike trail exists in only a few short segments. The highlight so far may be the 7 or 8 miles between...
Yayoi Kusama museum opens to sellout crowds
Yayoi Kusama museum opens to sellout crowds

A museum featuring the works of avant-garde artist Yayoi Kusama, who gained worldwide fame through her use of motifs such as polka dots and pumpkins, opened Oct. 1 in Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo, with tickets already sold out for this year.  The Yayoi Kusama Museum offers tickets that are valid for 90-minute viewing sessions, with four time slots per...
On a Windjammer cruise in Maine, passengers knit a seaworthy yarn
On a Windjammer cruise in Maine, passengers knit a seaworthy yarn

Captain Annie Mahle stood on the deck of the J. & E. Riggin and welcomed more than a dozen passengers already knuckle-deep in the theme of the September cruise.  As the guests knitted and purled, she described life aboard the two-masted schooner with no engine and marine plumbing. She discussed the toilet, which requires vigorous hand-pumping...
Five places to go in Athens
Five places to go in Athens

ATHENS, Greece — Travelers looking for a sense of where locals in Athens hang out should head to Kifissia, a leafy, upscale suburb north of the city center. While homegrown stores have long been a trademark here, eateries have been scarce. In recent years, that’s changed as it’s become easier to obtain restaurant licenses. Now, the...
More Stories