Hot Toys: Our toy testers played with Hatchimals on camera, here's what they think


Instead of just providing you with lists of the hottest toys this season, we made a call to Toys R' Us, set up a toy lab, then called in the experts. 

Toy Testers Evan (6) of Essentially Erika and Jameson (5) from West Palm Beach grabbed their lab coats and goggles from South Florida Science Center and got to work playing with the toys every mom is Googling right now.

If your kid is not obsessed with Hatchimals, know that at least three of his or her friends are. 

The soft egg hatches into what looks like it could be the mixed baby of a teddy bear dad and penguin mommy with unicorn ancestors. And they are selling out everywhere. 

Palm Beach Post Toy Lab Rating for Hatchimals: 1 thumb up, 1 thumb down  

But is it worth the search or the $50.00 (if you’re lucky)? 

For Evan, the hatching of the egg was the best part. It needed to be shaken, rubbed and tapped in order for it to come out of its shell.  The lights and noises that came from inside of the egg made both toy testers eager in a good, keep-em-busy kind of way.   

Once the boys welcomed their new toy into the world, Jameson was ready to step into parental guardian mode wanting to know if the thing was hungry, sleepy or needed playtime. 

 

The Deets: 

What: Hatchimals: An interactive magical creature that’s ready to be hatched and raised by your little one

Price: $49.99

Age: 5 years and up

Tip: READ THE INSTRUCTIONS. You will need to understand how this toy works in order for the fun to last.

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