Jada Pinkett Smith disputes accuracy of Tupac Shakur film


Rap legend Tupac Shakur would have been 46 on Friday, and childhood friend Jada Pinkett Smith took to social media to dispute the accuracy of her relationship with the late singer in the new film “All Eyez on Me.”

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“Forgive me ... my relationship to Pac is too precious to me for the scenes in ‘All Eyez on Me’ to stand as truth,” Pinkett Smith posted on Twitter.

Pinkett Smith tweeted eight times, disputing several scenes featuring her relationship with Shakur, who was gunned down in Las Vegas in 1996.

"The reimagining of my relationship to Pac has been deeply hurtful," Pinkett Smith tweeted.

However, the actress did not find fault with the actors who portrayed her and Shakur -- Kat Graham and Demetrious Shipp Jr., the Los Angeles Times reported.

"You both did a beautiful job with what you were given. Thank you both," she wrote.

L.T. Hutton, who produced “All Eyez on Me,” told TMZ that he was disappointed in Pinkett Smith’s criticisms. He said that he and the filmmakers took some liberties because they were trying to show who Shakur was, TMZ reported.

Hutton said that he studied Pinkett Smith’s words about Shakur in interviews, and believes she was fairly represented, TMZ reported.

Pinkett Smith ended her Twitter barrage with a tweet directed at Shakur, the Times reported.

"Happy birthday Pac, you are cradled in my heart for eternity,” she tweeted. “I love you."


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